yuan

The Financial Landscape: Dollar Losing Favor, Economy Losing Steam

The long term isn't looking good for the greenback: Central bank managers don't see it keeping its status as the world's reserve currency. The short term's not looking so hot for the U.S. economy either: Housing prices are down another 4% year over year, and confidence is falling.

The Bulls Are Optimistic Despite Global Turmoil

Despite turmoil around the world, U.S. markets have been rising again, but is this a temporary bump, or the return of a bull market? The sharp-eyed analysts of Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs say its the latter, and their money is on strong growth ahead.

Will China's 'Have-Nots' Be Next to Rebel?

In most respects, China a world away from the oil-dominated autocracies in the Mideast now seething with anti-government unrest. But it faces similar issues: high inflation and a troubling wealth gap that could fuel social upheavals, if Beijing doesn't make some big changes.

The Trade Deficit's Untold Story: Rising Exports

The trade deficit's rise to just under $500 billion in 2010 obscures an impressive rise in global sales of U.S. goods, and the outlook for 2011 is even better. But to reach a trade surplus, the U.S. must solve two serious problems.

As Japan Slips, China Moves Into Second Place

China has officially bumped Japan as the world's second largest economy. Japan reported its GDP grew only 1.8% last year to $5.47 trillion, while China's climbed 10.3% to $5.88 trillion.

Can China Tame Its Inflation Dragon?

To quell its rapidly climbing prices, China has raised interest rates for the third time since October. But the signs are growing that it may not be able to keep the problem under control. And despite the economic threat from inflation, China isn't likely to let its currency rise.

Currency Wars: How Ben Bernanke Outsmarted China

After years of exhorting China to increase the value of its yuan, the currency is finally rising: It has appreciated some 3.5% since June while China battles inflation and works to cool its red-hot economy. Here's how the Fed managed to succeed where political wrangling fell short.

A New Way to Bet on China: Open a Renminbi Bank Account

China's economy is booming, and Western nations are increasing their demands that its currency be allowed to rise to its natural value. Who knows if that will happen, but if you want to bet that it will, the Bank of China just made it easier: Now, Americans can open renminbi-denominated accounts.

Currency Wars Are Heating Up Across Latin America

Emerging market countries, especially those in Latin America, are gearing up for a potentially damaging round of currency interventions to help keep their economies competitive. "This is a currency war that is turning into a trade war," says Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega.

A Rising Dollar and Cooling China Will Pop the Commodities Bubble

The dollar is looking mighty attractive, thanks to a reviving U.S. economy and eurozone woes, and it will only get stronger as traders who gambled that it would fall buy dollars to unwind their bad bets. Add in China's desperate need to get its overheated economy in check, and commodities prices look like they have nowhere to go but down.

China Should Raise Its Currency Instead of Rates

China's decision to raise rates to contain food and housing price increases is a missed opportunity to move the country toward a more domestic-oriented economy. A higher yuan would slow exports, but it would be a bigger overall benefit to China's economy.

China Stole the Show in 2010. Next Year May Be Tougher

While the U.S. struggled with near-10% unemployment, China grew at that same pace over the past year. But the country faces massive internal problems that leave it in a far more difficult situation than the praise constantly heaped on it implies.

Caterpillar to Issue Renminbi-Denominated Debt

Heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar is marketing a two-year 1 billion renminbi bond to institutional investors in Hong Kong. It's only the second multinational company to test the waters of the "dim sum" market, and its offering is five times the size of the first, a bond from McDonald's.

Dow Dives 178 Points on Fears China May Hike Rates

The Dow tumbled Tuesday 178 points, or 1.6%, to close at 11,024 as part of a global sell-off in stocks fueled by further speculation that China will hike interest rates to fight inflation and renewed worries over the wobbly finances of Ireland, Portugal and Greece.

Diverging Fortunes Create Tension for China, U.S.

The seemingly symbiotic relationship between the China and America -- dubbed Chimerica -- is now clearly chimerical. What was once billed as the ideal partnership is quickly turning into a competition for global influence instead. Investors, beware.

G-20 Leaders Water Down U.S. Stance on Currencies

Leaders of 20 major economies on Friday refused to back a U.S. push to make China boost its currency's value. That will keep alive a dispute that raises fears of a global trade war amid criticism that cheap Chinese exports are costing American jobs.

G-20 Leaders Fail to Back U.S. Plan on Chinese Currency

The leaders of the 20 major economies failed to back a U.S. plan intended to push China to let its currency strengthen. The leaders released a statement in which all countries pledged to avoid "competitive devaluation" of currencies, The Associated Press said.

It's Time for a New Reserve Currency: Meet the Mondo

For a host of reasons, other countries would love to free their economies from the stranglehold of the U.S. dollar's influence, especially now, when the Fed's stimulus actions are pushing the dollar lower, and everything else higher. Global finance expert Peter Cohan has a simple answer: The Mondo.

Why Asian Nations Hate QE2, and What They Should Do

As the G-20 meets in South Korea, many world leaders have stepped up their complaints about the Fed's $600 billion quantitative easing program, as well as the rapid flow of capital into emerging markets. Some countries are installing capital controls in response, but those won't be enough, says global finance expert Peter Cohan.

What the Stocks vs. Dollar Seesaw Is Saying Now

For a host of reasons, when the dollar spikes, stocks drop, and when the dollar falls, stocks soar. Right now, with dollar sentiment reaching maximum bearishness, contrarians are preparing for the next seesaw shift. If the dollar rises again, stocks could reverse.

G-20 Leaders Criticize Fed's $600 Billion QE2 Stimulus

The U.S. finds itself on the wrong side of the currency manipulation argument this week, as many G20 countries criticize the Fed's $600 billion bond buying plan, which could further devalue the dollar. World leaders say the move breaks the vow of unity made during the last G-20 summit.

China, Germany Criticize U.S. Quantitative Easing

China and Germany, the world%u2019s second-largest and fourth-largest economies respectively, expressed concern about Federal Reserve plans to pump $600 billion into the U.S. economy. The Fed announced plans to buy $600 billion of assets earlier this week. The Fed hopes that the move, known as quantitative easing, will help boost the U.S. economy and lower unemployment.

Asian Markets Are Mixed as Investors Eye U.S. Elections

In Asia on Tuesday, Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index rose 0.1%, China's Shanghai Composite inched down 0.3%. and in Japan, the Nikkei 225 crept up 0.1%. Investors are closely monitoring the U.S. midterm elections, with many predicting that if the Democrats lose their majorities in both the House and the Senate, the dollar will continue to slide.

As the Dollar Weakens, Commodities Shine

Market watchers lately have loudly proclaimed the end of the dollar, which has left investors looking to stay ahead with a choice of betting on stocks, which have 17% fallen in the last decade, or staying "safe" in very low-yield money market funds. But there is an alternative: Commodities.

China Hikes Rates, and the World Stumbles

China surprised international markets Tuesday by raising key interest rates for the first time in three years. The action, taken primarily for domestic reasons, caused a worldwide sell-off driven by the worry that it could cause the Chinese economy to slow down.

Geithner: U.S. Won't Devalue the Dollar to Boost Exports

The U.S. will not weaken the dollar in order to boost its exports, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner promised. "It is not going to happen in this country," Geithner told Silicon Valley business leaders of devaluing the dollar, according to Reuters.

August Trade Gap Grows Due to Oil, Chinese Imports

The U.S. trade deficit unexpectedly jumped to $46.3 billion in August, as the nation%u2019s deficit with China surged to a record $28 billion -- pushing overall imports up 2.1%, while overall exports rose just 0.2%. Oil prices were the other key culprit as our petroleum deficit surged 5.7%.

Geithner Says U.S. Favors Significant Yuan Appreciation

Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner said the U.S. favors a "gradual, but still significant" appreciation of the yuan. Geithner said the U.S. would prefer China let market forces drive up the value of the currency, The Wall Street Journal said. Geithner noted that the yuan had strengthened by about 2.5% in six weeks.