yuan dollar exchange rate

The Trade Deficit's Untold Story: Rising Exports

The trade deficit's rise to just under $500 billion in 2010 obscures an impressive rise in global sales of U.S. goods, and the outlook for 2011 is even better. But to reach a trade surplus, the U.S. must solve two serious problems.

Currency Wars: How Ben Bernanke Outsmarted China

After years of exhorting China to increase the value of its yuan, the currency is finally rising: It has appreciated some 3.5% since June while China battles inflation and works to cool its red-hot economy. Here's how the Fed managed to succeed where political wrangling fell short.

A New Way to Bet on China: Open a Renminbi Bank Account

China's economy is booming, and Western nations are increasing their demands that its currency be allowed to rise to its natural value. Who knows if that will happen, but if you want to bet that it will, the Bank of China just made it easier: Now, Americans can open renminbi-denominated accounts.

A Rising Dollar and Cooling China Will Pop the Commodities Bubble

The dollar is looking mighty attractive, thanks to a reviving U.S. economy and eurozone woes, and it will only get stronger as traders who gambled that it would fall buy dollars to unwind their bad bets. Add in China's desperate need to get its overheated economy in check, and commodities prices look like they have nowhere to go but down.

China Should Raise Its Currency Instead of Rates

China's decision to raise rates to contain food and housing price increases is a missed opportunity to move the country toward a more domestic-oriented economy. A higher yuan would slow exports, but it would be a bigger overall benefit to China's economy.

G-20 Leaders Fail to Back U.S. Plan on Chinese Currency

The leaders of the 20 major economies failed to back a U.S. plan intended to push China to let its currency strengthen. The leaders released a statement in which all countries pledged to avoid "competitive devaluation" of currencies, The Associated Press said.

China, Germany Criticize U.S. Quantitative Easing

China and Germany, the world%u2019s second-largest and fourth-largest economies respectively, expressed concern about Federal Reserve plans to pump $600 billion into the U.S. economy. The Fed announced plans to buy $600 billion of assets earlier this week. The Fed hopes that the move, known as quantitative easing, will help boost the U.S. economy and lower unemployment.

Asian Markets Are Mixed as Investors Eye U.S. Elections

In Asia on Tuesday, Hong Kong's Hang Seng Index rose 0.1%, China's Shanghai Composite inched down 0.3%. and in Japan, the Nikkei 225 crept up 0.1%. Investors are closely monitoring the U.S. midterm elections, with many predicting that if the Democrats lose their majorities in both the House and the Senate, the dollar will continue to slide.

As the Dollar Weakens, Commodities Shine

Market watchers lately have loudly proclaimed the end of the dollar, which has left investors looking to stay ahead with a choice of betting on stocks, which have 17% fallen in the last decade, or staying "safe" in very low-yield money market funds. But there is an alternative: Commodities.

China Hikes Rates, and the World Stumbles

China surprised international markets Tuesday by raising key interest rates for the first time in three years. The action, taken primarily for domestic reasons, caused a worldwide sell-off driven by the worry that it could cause the Chinese economy to slow down.

August Trade Gap Grows Due to Oil, Chinese Imports

The U.S. trade deficit unexpectedly jumped to $46.3 billion in August, as the nation%u2019s deficit with China surged to a record $28 billion -- pushing overall imports up 2.1%, while overall exports rose just 0.2%. Oil prices were the other key culprit as our petroleum deficit surged 5.7%.

Why Easing the Threat of Currency War Is So Difficult

Investors take note: Despite the calls for order, national policymakers are dealing with an increasingly haphazard scenario loaded with counterproductive results and unintended consequences. The result could be a slide toward protectionism.

China Warns Against Duties on Imports to U.S.

China denounced a bill passed by the U.S. House of Representatives that aims to push up the value of the Chinese currency. The bill, which would let U.S. companies petition for duties on Chinese imports to compensate for the impact of the weak yuan, would hurt the global economy if it became law, the Chinese government said today.

Yuan Hits High Vs. the Dollar as China Nudges Exchange Peg

The Chinese yuan hit a post-revaluation high against the dollar Monday after the People's Bank of China set the yuan's reference rate for trading at its highest level since the central bank began publishing the daily fix in 1994. The yuan can rise or fall 0.5% each day from the reference point.