workers

Economists: Jobs Are Coming.
The Unemployed: When?

An increasing number of observers, citing a preponderance of positive data, are optimistic that the stagnant labor market is finally beginning to gain momentum. But the pace is still way too slow for those desperately seeking work.

Holiday Hiring Takes a Hit, Despite a Brighter Economy

Retailers and shipping companies are adding fewer new jobs than they did a year ago. One reason for the low number is that employers began shopping for seasonal workers earlier than usual, boosting hiring in October. If retail sales hold up, December could see more hiring.

Millions of Unemployed Face a Loss of Benefits

Unemployed Americans are keenly awaiting congressional action on the latest extension of jobless benefits. With a midnight Tuesday deadline looming, some 2 million jobless workers face losing their only source of income in coming weeks.

Qualified Good News From Initial Jobless Claims

The latest weekly initial claims report showed a small increase, some 2,000 higher to 439,000. The more-telling four-week moving average dropped by 4,000 to 443,000, and continuing claims fell another 48,000 to 4.3 million. Overall, that's all qualified good news.

The Politics of Long-Term Unemployment

Come the end of November, some 2 million jobless workers won't be able to rely on their unemployment check unless Congress again extends the aid. But with the GOP regaining the House, the odds of that extension just got a lot longer.

Deadline Looms for Laid-Off GM Workers to Claim Ohio Jobs

Autoworkers laid off from a General Motors plant in Orion Township, Mich., have until the end of the day Tuesday to decide whether to take jobs at the automaker's Lordstown assembly plant, some 250 miles away in neighboring Ohio.

Obama Launches Initiative to Boost Worker Skills

In an effort to boost worker skills to better match the needs of employers, President Barack Obama today unveiled Skills For America's Future, a new initiative to increase workforce development, worker training and job placement.

Obama Attacks GOP for Failing to Act on Economy

In a rare Friday press conference at the White House, President Obama stayed on the offense against Republican, accusing them of dragging their feet just as the economy needs another boost.

Domestic Workers Finally Get Some Rights

Just in time for Labor Day, domestic workers in New York state got a gift of sorts -- a workers' bill of rights, which Gov. David Paterson signed into law last week. The measure guarantees nannies, housekeepers and care providers to the elderly are paid overtime, get time off and are protected against sexual harassment.

Pay Raises Are Smaller Than Expected This Year

Workers who got less of a raise than they anticipated this year aren't alone. A new Hewitt survey of large companies finds the nation's slack recovery has prompted many employers to rein in expenses, thereby reducing planned raises and bonuses.

The 25 Companies That Cut 700,000 Jobs

Since the recession began, more than 8 million Americans have lost their jobs. But perhaps even more surprising is the small number of companies that are responsible for laying off such a large percentage of today's unemployed workers.

The Growing Strains Between Employees and Employers

A new report from Hewitt Associates highlight a growing tension between stressed employers and fatigued workers, who are responding to a lengthy period of uncertainty and confusion brought about by the recession and their companies' actions.

A Glimmer of Hope on the Employment Front

More than half of large U.S. businesses that reduced staff in the last year plan to rebuild their workforces to pre-recession levels within two years, according to a recent report by employment-consultancy Accenture.

People@Work: How to Job Hunt with Tattoos

With more than 30% of 18- to 45-year-olds sporting tattoos, they're becoming more acceptable to employers overall. But they could still land you in the "No way!" pile for some jobs. Read about when to display and when to hide your body art, and other tips for job-hunting Millennials.

No Jobs Yet: Execs See Little Hiring Until Next Year

Chief financial officers at U.S. companies are increasingly pessimistic about the job market over the next six to 12 months: Results from two independent surveys say most firms don%u2019t plan to do any significant hiring until 2011 or beyond.

Billionaire in Heated Battle Over Detroit's Ambassador Bridge

Manuel "Matty" Moroun enjoys a monopoly over one of the nation's busiest international trade routes between Detroit and Ontario. But now, as his Ambassador Bridge is starting to show its 81 years, Moroun has found himself frantically defending his claim to the lucrative trade business that takes place across the Detroit River each year.

Toyota Hopes to Restart Chinese Factory on Monday

Toyota said Thursday that an ongoing strike by workers at parts supplier Denso means its large plant in Guangzhou, China, will remain closed through the weekend. But a limited resumption of production at the parts plant is expected to allow Toyota to restart its assembly lines as soon as Monday.

'Death on the High Seas Act' Needs Fixing to Help BP Widows

BP can pay the family of a rig worker killed in the Deepwater Horizon explosion a mere $1,000 as compensation for the death thanks to the outdated Death on the High Seas Act. Congress has vowed to change the act, but it may not be as easy as they think.

Does America's New Economy Favor Women?

Despite its provocative title, The Atlantic magazine's cover story The End of Men focuses less on the gender wars and more on this question: What if postindustrial society is better suited to female workers?