washington dc

Starbucks Cups to Come with a Political Message

The world's biggest coffee chain is asking employees at cafes in the Washington, D.C., area to scribble the words "Come Together" on cups for drink orders on Thursday and Friday. CEO Howard Schultz says it's intended as a message to lawmakers about the ongoing "fiscal cliff" negotiations.

Why Some Consumers Remain Confident

U.S. economic confidence fell slightly in the first half of this year compared to the same period last year. But consumers in the District of Columbia and states such as Maryland, Virginia, Utah and Massachusetts kept their confidence up. Here's why.

Five Takeaways from the Debt Debate

As the debt-ceiling discussion winds down in Washington and everyone laments over the meaning and mutual downside of compromise, the economy is still in trouble. But we learned some lessons along the way. Here are some key points from the debacle.

10 Most Popular U.S. Summer Vacation Cities

When it's time for some R&R in the sun, Americans have a wealth of options. But based on summertime hotel room rentals, which one takes the crown? Orlando with its theme parks? New York with its culture? Washington with it's history? L.A. with its beaches? None of the above. Curious? Read on ...

The 10 U.S. Cities Where Parking Is Most Expensive

City dwellers know that finding an affordable downtown parking spot involves cutthroat competition. And in some urban centers, even the winners pay through the nose for a place to stash their cars. Find out where the rates are worst (and the high price we all pay for "free" parking.)

New York Cabbies Fare Badly as Gas Prices Soar

With gas prices shooting ever higher, cities such as Chicago, Las Vegas and Miami have either allowed cab drivers to levy fuel surcharges or are considering them. But in New York, where the drivers of nation's largest cab fleet are struggling to make ends meet, officials say a surcharge isn't even being considered.

Sorry, AT&T: Corporations Probably Don't Have 'Personal Privacy'

When the government releases documents under the Freedom of Information Act, it still has to protect human beings' personal privacy. This week, AT&T asked the Supreme Court to apply the same privacy principle to corporations. A ruling is months away, but it didn't sound like even the conservative wing of the court was buying it.

Blizzards Boosting Some Businesses' Bottom Lines

Mother Nature's fury has left a path of fiscal destruction that will linger far after the record-breaking snowfall starts to melt -- and she's not done yet. Another foot of snow is expected to fall over the next day or two, blanketing the Mid-Atlantic region yet again. Back-to-back snow storms are the last thing cash-strapped businesses and state and local governments need right now. But for some businesses, blizzards mean opportunity.