university

Wal-Mart's U.S. CEO Is Another Public College Grad

Wal-Mart, the largest company in the world, has had four CEOs, all of them public college alumni, and CEO No. 5, William Simon, continues that run: He's a graduate of the University of Connecticut. The point? You don't need to go to a big-name school to be a big-time success.

Reform Is Coming to For-Profit Education Industry

The for-profit education industry has grown rapidly for the past decade on the backs of the most vulnerable members of society. But now, with the Department of Education on track to clamp down on abuses, and the Senate planning hearings, it looks like the party may be ending.

Should NYU Have Higher Ethics Than a Payday Lender?

The New York Times recently looked at the plight of Cortney Munna, a graduate of New York University struggling with nearly $100,000 in student loans, and asked: Should schools abet students in the process of financial self destruction, or should they follow a higher purpose?

Selling Education Short: For-Profit School Stocks May Be Ripe for a Fall

Since George W. Bush gutted regulations on the for-profit education industry, it has experienced huge profit growth, while appalling percentages of its students drop out with no degrees and big debts. But if the government restores consumer protection regulations, look for those profits to plummet.

The Dubious Finances of University Endowments

The nonprofit Center for Social Philanthropy reports that many institutions of higher learning were far from innocent victims of the economic downturn. Rather, risky endowment investing played a major role in the financial meltdown.

Wisconsin Badgers Cut Ties with Nike Over Labor Concerns

The University of Wisconsin canceled its licensing agreement with Nike, becoming the first university to take that step over concerns about the shoemaker's treatment of workers in Honduras. The school said Nike hasn't done enough to help workers collect severance payments they are owed.

iPad Textbooks: Will Cool Tech Win on Campus?

If there's one thing college students hate more than going to class without a laptop or smartphone, it's paying full price for a $400 textbook they'll barely crack. But although the iPad will be pricey, it may usher a new age of digital textbook adoption to campus.