unions

Hostess Gets OK to Begin Winding Down Business

Hostess Brands lived to die another day. The maker of Twinkies and Ding Dongs said late Tuesday that it failed to reach an agreement with its second-biggest union. As a result, Hostess will be in court Wednesday asking for a bankruptcy judge for permission to shutter its operations.

Labor Day Pop Quiz: What Are We Really Celebrating This Weekend?

Most people only think of Labor Day as a nice excuse for long weekend, the beginning of fall, or the start of football season. But it's actually one of the most controversial American holidays, a celebration of the unionized laborers -- who made America strong.

GOP's Anti-Union Measure Fails in the Senate

The Senate rejected a Republican attempt Tuesday to overturn new regulations designed to give unions quicker representation elections in their effort to organize more workplaces.

What Unions Should Have Said in New Ad Campaign

Organized labor in the U.S. has been under sustained assault for some time; now, unions are fighting back with a major ad campaign designed to improve their image. Problem is, the centerpiece commercial mangles the message -- and misses the point.

How 'Welfare Capitalism' Can Save Our Country

With the effective unemployment rate possibly above 16%, the "job-creators" have little incentive to offer robust benefits packages to workers. But a look at U.S. economic history suggests that it's time to revisit the idea that a corporation can remain highly profitable over the long term by providing a floor of economic security for its employees.

Is It Time for Unions to Sober Up?

In this economy, many Americans feel grateful to have jobs in the first place. The nation's high unemployment rate makes recent video of some of Chrysler's unionized workers drinking and smoking pot on the job all the more galling. It's time for unions to stop protecting slacker employees.

The Financial Landscape: SEC Fines JPM Over CDOs

The news across the financial world is good for unions, which will find organizing a bit easier; adequate for Greece, which will find getting bailed out a bit easier, and bitter for JPMorgan which had to accept a $153.6 million SEC fine for misleading investors about a mortgage securities transaction.

Workers' Rights 100 Years After the Triangle Fire

A century after the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire claimed the lives of 146 seamstresses in New York, worker protections are eroding around the world. As government and corporate interests from Bangladesh to Wisconsin wage war on the rights of labor, have the lessons of the Triangle disaster been forgotten?

Strike! Eleven of the Best Union Movies Ever

Regardless of your political leanings, the struggle for fair wages and collective bargaining is fraught with drama, and Hollywood's union movies have inspired some amazing performances. With the public workers standoff in the news now, here are a few of Tinseltown's best offerings.

Former Northwest Employees Sue Delta Over Pay Discrepancy

A half-dozen Delta Air Lines flight attendants sued the carriers for what they say is discrimination in the form of smaller profit-sharing paychecks for former Northwest Airlines employees, the Associated Press reported Wednesday.

Labor's Fall -- Not Oil's Rise -- Is Key to Inflation

Despite all the worry over the impact of rising oil prices, recall that the U.S. is now a largely services-based economy, and observe that the rising wages that have led to real overall cost rises in decades past are nowhere to be found today. Exhibit A is in Wisconsin.

Before Wisconsin: Five of American Labor's Biggest Battles

Can you say image problem? For the first time in the more than 70 years that Gallup has been measuring the popularity of unions, in 2009 more than half the public didn't approve of them. The current showdown in Wisconsin has plenty of precedent when it comes to transformative moments for organized labor.

State Governments Are Just Adding to Labor's Woes

American labor unions have been in decline for a half-century now -- and, currently, virtually the only large unions still growing are those in the public sector. Until now. Cash-strapped states are attacking unions where it hurts by trying to strip them of the right to collectively bargain.

Equal Pay: A Battle Is Brewing in the Senate

Already passed in the House, the Paycheck Fairness Act would make it easier for women to file pay-discrimination class actions against employers, and it removes caps on punitive damages under the Equal Pay Act. It doesn't solve why women are paid less than men for the same work.

Four Trends That Will Dramatically Change China

The financial media's coverage of China tends to focus on trade-related topics, but China is undergoing deep cultural shifts that will dramatically alter its economic landscape. These four long-term trends could drastically change China -- and its relationship with the world.

Business and Labor Are Girding for the 'Check Card' War

Health care could soon be yesterday's battle. Business groups are now bracing themselves for a new fight in Congress against the growing power of unions. At issue is the Employee Free Choice Act (EFCA), also known as Card Check, a union-backed proposal that would enable workers to join a union if more than 50% of workers at a facility sign membership cards. A government-mandated arbitrator could enact a contract if the employer and the union don't reach an agreement within 120 days.

Tap runs dry for Molson retirees

Retirees from Molson Brewing Company in Canada are learning that their retirement benefits are being cut and the worst news is that they can't even...