u.s. treasury

U.S. Hits Borrowing Limit, Moves to Avoid Default

The U.S. government is running up against its $16.4 trillion borrowing limit and is taking steps to avoid default. Reaching the limit Monday sets up another dispute between the White House and Congress over taxes and spending in the new year.

Two Heads Were Not Better Than One for Arizona Counterfeiter

Counterfeiting is a detail-oriented art, but one Arizona man who attempted it wasn't quite scrupulous enough about his fake bills: He attempted to pass a forged $100 bill with a picture-perfect image of Benjamin Franklin -- but a watermark of Abraham Lincoln.

Tax Deadline Looms: Advice for Last-Minute Filers

U.S. taxpayers get three extra days this year to file their income tax returns, but if you've put off doing your taxes, it's time to get organized -- and possibly to get help. Because if you owe Uncle Sam, even if you file for an extension, you'd better have his check in the mail by midnight Monday.

Uncle Sam Wants You. . .to Buy Treasury Bonds

The Treasury has to find buyers for trillions of dollars in new bonds needed to fund the federal deficit. It hopes average citizens will pony up and invest in some $337 billion worth. But for a host of reasons, "safe" T-bonds might not be a winning investment for you.

Social Insecurity: Inside the 'Trust Fund' Illusion

The federal government has been borrowing Social Security's surpluses for decades and issuing the program IOUs in return. However, the ability to pay those IOUs depends on the Treasury borrowing more money on global bond market at affordable rates. That's hardly a sure thing.

Social Security Is in Far Worse Shape Than You Think

For years, policymakers have reassured the public that Social Security will be solvent for decades. But federal spending and income data from the Treasury reveals that Social Security is already deep in the red, with outlays exceeding payroll tax revenues by $76 billion in 2010 alone.

GM IPO Brings In $11.7 Billion for the U.S. Treasury

The initial public offering of General Motors last week netted $11.7 billion for the U.S. Treasury, which invested taxpayer money into keeping the then-struggling automaker solvent during the financial crisis as part of its Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Seven Villians of the Financial Crisis: Where Are They Now?

The financial crisis was produced by a complex set of circumstances, including a massive housing bubble, poor regulation and irresponsible lending on an epic scale. A handful of bankers became the public faces of the crisis, and now, two years later, we take a look at what became of them.

AIG is one big taxpayer IOU

In the years ahead, whenever economic conservatives and market absolutists point out the wonders of the market, just mention a popular four-letter...