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Your Next Cable TV Provider Could Be Google or Apple

Something big is going down in Kansas City. Google is offering lightning-fast Internet and television at ridiculous prices. And it's only a matter of time before Apple disrupts cable the way it redefined the music and smartphone industries.

Savings Experiment: Video Games

Any legit gamer knows that the billion dollar gaming industry has to compete for your business. There are stores and websites that specialize in trading, discount and rentals, as well as plenty of free online games and downloadable titles. When certain games are released, they may be nearly impossible to buy cheap. Still, you may be able to beat the industry at their own game.

Old TV Stars Fight Over Merchandise

The shows have been off the air for years, but the battle continues. Stars from TV classics, including The Partridge Family and Happy Days, are suing their former studios over royalty money -- for toys, lunch boxes, board games, books and even slot machines -- that they claim is long overdue.

My 3 Cents: Fix It or Nix It? A Gadget Conundrum

Your favorite gadget just broke, and is no longer under warranty. Should you repair it or replace it? DailyFinance consumer advisor Regina Lewis examines the best options for your ongoing consumer electronics happiness.

Should Netflix Stream Its Video Business Into the U.K.?

Netflix is enjoying a period of rapid expansion, riding on the popularity of DVD-by-mail and online video streaming. The question for investors is: What's next? Netflix has signaled that it plans to expand abroad, and the U.K. is a likely target. But is Britain ready for Netflix?

As TV Sales Lag, Philips Tunes Into Healthcare

Earlier this week, Royal Philips Electronics warned that its television business would post a first-quarter loss. While TV sales have declined, the company says it sees a growing opportunity in healthcare. Greg Sebasky, CEO of Philips's North American operations, discusses the trends driving the growth -- and the challenges ahead.

In This Corner, Netflix. In the Other Corner. . .Amazon?

Netflix, whose DVD-by-mail service hastened the demise of several video rental chains, may soon find itself under siege from Amazon. The world's largest online retailer appears to be on the verge of launching its own unlimited movie and TV-show streaming service.

Beyond TVs: Vizio Now Sees Big Growth in Small Screens

Now the No. 1. U.S. seller of LCD TVs, Vizio is setting its sights on the smartphone and tablet computer markets. But will its low-cost business model translate to the mobile electronics market? That's not a sure bet, but it'll be interesting to watch.

Oprah Winfrey Network Draws More Than 1 Million Viewers

Oprah Winfrey%u2019s cable TV network drew more than 1 million viewers on its debut over the weekend. The new channel, Oprah Winfrey Network (OWN), launched at noon on New Year%u2019s Day, The Wall Street Journal said. It replaced Discovery Health in about 80 million homes.

Congress Considers Regulating Noisy Ads

Congress could be days away from turning down the volume on blaring TV ads. The Commercial Advertising Loudness Mitigation (CALM) Act would ban TV ads that have a louder volume than the shows they interrupt, The Wall Street Journal said.

Palins Boost TV Ratings Over Thanksgiving Week

Bristol Palin helped boost the viewership for "Dancing with the Stars" when she made it to the final round, while her mother's show, "Sarah Palin's Alaska" got half a million more viewers in the same week.

Church of England Opposes Murdoch Bid for BSkyB

Rupert Murdoch may face opposition from a higher power in his bid to take full control of British satellite TV provider BSkyB. The Church of England said that it opposes News Corp.%u2019s (NWS) plans for BSkyB, saying that such a deal would allow News Corp. to "dominate" the country%u2019s media, The New York Times reported.

Midterm Election TV Viewership Up 11% from 2006

Networks broadcasting midterm election results attracted 11% more viewers than they did during the 2006 elections, and about a third more than the 2002 midterms, indicating the heightened level political interest among Americans concerned about House and Senate races, Nielsen reported Friday.