treasury

Top Executives at Bailed-Out Firms Have Pay Cut

Nearly 70 top executives at three companies bailed out by the taxpayers during the 2008 financial crisis -- AIG, Ally Financial and GM -- were ordered to take pay 10% cuts by the federal government, and the CEOs had their pay frozen at 2011 levels.

Why Rising Interest Rates Won't Break the Bull's Run

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note closed at a nine-month high Wednesday, and rising interest rates usually mean bad things for economic growth and stock prices. But until the benchmark hits 5%, explains market guru Jeffrey Kleintop, rising rates mean the good times for stock will continue.

Treasury Turns to Prepaid Debit Cards for Tax Refunds

The Treasury Department is launching a pilot program to deliver tax refunds via prepaid debit cards rather than checks. The plan aims to cut down on the administrative costs associated with checks and to help lower-income taxpayers without bank accounts, The Wall Street Journal said.

More Top Obama Economic Aides to Step Down

Two of President Barack Obama%u2019s top economic advisers plan to quit. White House National Economic Council Deputy Director Diana Farrell and Treasury Department Assistant Secretary for Financial Institutions Michael Barr both plan to leave in the coming weeks, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Obama Praises GM Bailout as Shares Gain 4% in IPO

Following General Motors' historic return as a publicly traded company Thursday, President Obama said the U.S. government, despite the many critics, is on track to more than recoup the nearly $50 billion it invested in the Detroit automaker.

GM's IPO: Recovery -- Not the End of the Road

Considering where the iconic carmaker has been in recent years, the pending IPO -- and robust investor demand for shares -- is a remarkably positive step. But GM still has plenty of problem spots that will need fixing if this historic event is to have lasting meaning.

ING Forecasts Market Growth of 8% to 12% in 2011

ING Investment Management forecasts that stock markets will rise between 8% and 12% in 2011, thanks to a low-inflation, low-interest environment supported by the Fed, despite weak GDP growth. And for those looking for to increase their investment yields, they have a few suggestions.

General Motors May Raise Its IPO Price

GM reportedly plans to raise the price range on its pending initial public of stock to as much as $33 a share. The increase to $31 to $33 a share from the initial $26 to $29 a share is being prompted by strong demand for the stock.

QE2, Day One: Fed Buys $7.3 Billion in Treasuries

Fed Completes First Day oThe Federal Reserve bought $7.3 billion worth of U.S. Treasuries Friday as it started a second round of quantitative easing meant to stimulate the nation's economy, media reports indicate. The plan, designed to boost job creation and prevent deflation, has been highly criticized. f QE2 Treasuries Purchases

Budget Deficit Unexpectedly Narrowed in October

The U.S. government started the new fiscal year on the right foot, posting $140.4 billion deficit in October, the first month of the new fiscal year. That was substantially lower than the $148 billion deficit that had been forecast.

Bank of America May Pay Employee Bonuses in Stock

As Bank of America continues to cope with fallout from the housing and mortgage crisis, the financial institution may have to pay some year-end employee bonuses in the form of stock because of a possible cash shortfall related to its buy-back of stock from the federal government.

Chrysler May Soon See More Federal Aid

In addition to state tax credits from Michigan -- and the billions of dollars already loaned it by U.S. taxpayers in the form of last year's bailout -- Chrysler may soon get approval for billions more in loans from the Department of Energy.

Report: Treasury Outsourced Foreclosure Bailout

The government%u2019s efforts to stem the foreclosure crisis may have been hampered by its reliance on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, according to a new report. The two mortgage giants have "a history of profound corporate mismanagement," and were overly reliant on subcontractors, the report by the Congressional Oversight Panel said.

Treasury Announces $1.5 Billion Small Business Package

The Treasury Department announced a $1.5 billion lending package to boost small businesses at the state level. The money will be available to states that can demonstrate that they will generate $10 in new private lending for every dollar of federal funds they receive, Reuters said. This could create a package worth a total of $15 billion.

Fed's Dudley Hints at Further Action to Ease Money Supply

Further monetary action by the Fed may be warranted because of high unemployment rates and low inflation, said Federal Reserve Bank of New York President William Dudley during a speech Friday at the Society of American Business Editors and Writers conference in New York.

Government Close to Announcing AIG Exit Strategy

The government is close to announcing its plans to end the bailout of American International Group (AIG), returning the company to independence and recovering taxpayer funds. The Treasury is planning to begin converting its $49 billion preferred stake into common stock for sales, Bloomberg News said without naming its sources. The plan could be announced this week.

Summers to Step Down as Obama's Economic Adviser

Lawrence Summers will step down from his role as President Obama's National Economic Council director and return to Harvard University after the midterm elections in November, according to reports.

GM IPO: Open to All Investors

There have been some questions over the past few weeks about whether the General Motors IPO would include restrictions on money put into the shares from investors overseas. GM made it clear recently the the U.S. Treasury would hold some of its share indefinitely as opposed to disposing of them as soon after the IPO as possible.

Overhaul May Transform Mortgage Giants Fannie and Freddie

Mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac may not even exist in their current forms after a revamp of the U.S. housing finance system, Assistant Treasury Secretary Michael Barr said on Tuesday. Moreover, "private gains will no longer be subsidized by public losses," he said.