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DVDs Are Dying: Can Anything Rescue Hollywood?

DVDs -- and even their more modern Blu-ray siblings -- are gradually fading to black, as VHS and LaserDisc did before them. Movie studios have seen this coming for some time. Problem is, it's part of a bigger trend they may not be able to overcome.

8 Brands That Blew the Most Money on Super Bowl Ads

Between 2002 and 2011, companies spent a whopping $2.5 billion on Super Bowl advertising; this year, a 30-second commercial cost an average of $3.5 million. But what do you get for all that cash. In the case of these eight major advertisers, not as much as they'd hoped.

SpongeBob's Big Problem: An Ocean of Streaming Video

The yellow fellow who lives in a pineapple under the sea -- and all his Nickelodeon pals -- are suddenly getting kicked in the SquarePants by the on-demand video revolution. Can Viacom adjust the new order of children's entertainment before Nick's ratings sink to the ocean floor?

Netflix Revives a Cult Classic - and Its Own Fortunes

Eventually Netflix, had to stop doing stupid things and do a smart one -- and it did. It has made a deal to be the exclusive home of "Arrested Development" when the critically acclaimed comedy returns to TV in 2013.

Watch to Watch This Week on Wall Street

There's never a dull moment on Wall Street -- now more than ever! From homebuilder earnings to yoga pants to Netflix's stock, here are a few items that will help shape the week ahead.

Why Are LEGOs So Expensive?

It's a question that echoes across the Internet, on blogs and message boards, and in the content of a specialty wiki called Brickipedia: "Why are Legos so expensive?" Our search for an answer starts in Denmark, and ends in the playrooms of countless children around the world.

Old TV Stars Fight Over Merchandise

The shows have been off the air for years, but the battle continues. Stars from TV classics, including The Partridge Family and Happy Days, are suing their former studios over royalty money -- for toys, lunch boxes, board games, books and even slot machines -- that they claim is long overdue.

5 Things to Watch Next Week: Potter Mania, Earnings

There's no such thing as a summertime lull when earnings season is upon us. Next week will bring plenty of headlines -- among them box office receipts for the last Harry Potter film and quarterly results from Apple, Cintas, and Microsoft.

YouTube Draws Nearly 40% of Online Video Visits

YouTube has been a powerhouse in the online video arena since well before Google bought it. YouTube dominates the sector, accounting for nearly four out of 10 online video viewing sessions in the U.S. in May. What's still a question is how much the video-sharing site will add to Google profits.

Facebook: Writing a Script for Online Movie Consolidation?

Warner Brothers is launching the first streaming-video app that lets people rent movies through Facebook. First up: The Dark Knight. It's a small test, but when Facebook enters a business, competitors get nervous: Here's how this move could trigger a round of mergers among the established players.

Good Riddance: Warner Bros. Finally Cuts Off Charlie Sheen

Warner Bros. finally had enough of Sheen's antics. The producers figured that the show's star -- who was reportedly paid nearly $2 million an episode --- was no longer worth the considerable trouble he created. Still, the move is a financial risk.

Where Charlie's Meltdown Is Fuel for Business

While painful (for most folks) to watch, the actor's explosion has created a bonanza for the tabloid mill. But on a broader level, Sheen has also offers a potential shot in the arm for companies across the spectrum, from media to pharmaceuticals.

What's Behind the Share Buyback Binge?

Companies that have piled up cash over the past few years are finding one good use for it: Repurchasing their own shares. January alone saw $57 billion in buybacks, compared with $357 billion for all of 2010. While buybacks don't add value, they do give investors more options.

Face-Off on Stocks: Disney, Viacom, Time Warner

It's award season in Hollywood, with the Oscars just weeks away. But stocks are forward-looking, so investors are already keying on summer blockbuster season. And a bigger-than-expected summer hit or two can indeed provide a catalyst for media and entertainment company shares.

Can Google's Android Undercut iTunes for News?

Google is considering a plan to charge publishers less to sell news to Android users than the 30% fee that Apple typically charges to sell apps on iTunes. Will that be enough to attract news publishers?

Mark Zuckerberg Racks Up Some Hefty Kudos

Time magazine has unveiled its Person of the Year for 2010: Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. And in a separate accolade, his company was also named the Best Place to Work for 2011. You can almost hear the seething over at Google.

First-Run Movies at Home -- for $20,000

That's the price tag for a Prima Cinema system that'll let you watch the latest releases at home from day one. The cost is sure to keep the market small, for now at least. The promise is that this is just the first step to more widespread at-home distribution.

Are Fox News and MSNBC Mirror Images?

When News Corp. (NWS) made two high-profile donations to Republican organizations totaling $2 million, liberals were outraged, saying it proved the media conglomerate and its Fox News Channel were fronts for the Republican Party. On the opposite side of the political aisle, the same point was made after Keith Olbermann's suspension by MSNBC. The truth, though, is more ambiguous.