the wall street journal

10 Reasons Why You're Not Feeling Better About the Economy

The Dow is cruising at new highs, 236,000 jobs were created in February, consumer confidence is up, and Americans are feeling secure enough to take on new debt again. But if you're feeling somehow left out of the party, you aren't crazy. Things are still far from golden.

Dell Buyout Deal Worth Up to $24 Billion Is Close, Say Sources

Shares of Dell climbed in premarket trading Tuesday on reports the personal computer maker is nearing a deal to go private worth up to $24 billion. The transaction is said to involve a group including Microsoft, private equity firm Silver Lake and CEO Michael Dell.

S&P Expects U.S. Lawsuit Over Its Mortgage Ratings

The U.S. government is expected to file civil charges against Standard & Poor's Ratings Services, alleging that it improperly gave high ratings to mortgage debt that later plunged in value and helped fuel the 2008 financial crisis.

JPMorgan CEO Sees Pay Slashed Over London Whale Trading Loss

JPMorgan Chase reported a 55 percent jump in earnings for the fourth quarter as mortgage fees and other income surged. The bank also released its reviews of a $6 billion trading loss that drew sanctions from regulators, and said it would cut CEO Jamie Dimon's pay by more than half as a result.

Freedom from Earsplitting Ads: The CALM Act Goes Into Effect

You may not have heard about the CALM Act before, but when you witness the results as the law goes into effect today, you'll probably want to applaud loudly. At last, TV commercials can no longer be broadcast at a higher volume than the programs they accompany.

Apple TV Comes a Step Closer to Home Entertainment Reality

Apple is testing smart TV designs with major Asian component suppliers, The Wall Street Journal reports. And executives at some suppliers for the world's most valuable tech company are confirming that designs for a large-screen high-def television are in the works.

Even Warren Buffett Can't Save the Small Newspaper Business

The problem with the newspaper business is simple: A subscription price barely pays for the paper your papers are printed on, and free media are siphoning off the ad revenues newspapers rely on. Warren Buffet thought he could buck the trend, but not even the Oracle of Omaha can fight math.

Found Money: Life Insurers Start to Seek Out Missing Beneficiaries

Odd thing: Just being the beneficiary of a life insurance policy doesn't mean you'll get the money when the policyholder dies. Turns out, you have to ask for it. And people failing to ask has led to as much as $1 billion going, not to people's heirs, but to the states. Thankfully, that's changing.

Bankers Agree: 'Too Big to Fail' Has Failed

Maybe if we called it "2B2F," it would have been more popular. But lacking the street cred of a cool nickname, the idea "too big to fail" is beginning to lose popularity in America -- even among some of the country's most famous bankers

'Weak' Retail Sales? Someone Forgot to Tell Shoppers

The media's response to recent retail sales numbers showing month-to-month declines has been to bemoan our faltering economy. But when you compare sales today to a year ago, things don't look grim at all. In some cases, in fact, they look downright fantastic.

Merchants May Win the Right to Charge Credit Card Users More

Merchants have long sought the right to charge customers more for paying with a credit card, which would help them defray the cost of accepting plastic. That's currently banned by Visa and MasterCard, but deal in the works could change that.

Ousted Duke CEO Earns Up to $44.4 Million for a Few Hours Work

When Progress Energy agreed to be bought by Duke Energy, it was agreed that its CEO, Bill Johnson, would run the combined company. Instead, Johnson was pushed out by the board -- mere hours after he took over. But don't feel bad for him -- his golden parachute is enormous.

Look Who's Buying America Now!

While Americans are still reeling from the housing bust, people from around the globe are scooping up cheap American homes. Over the 12 months that ended in March, nearly 9% of all real estate spending in the U.S. was done by buyers from abroad. Is it "Rising Sun" all over again?

Stock Market Cuts Its Losses with a Late Rally

A late recovery on Wall Street wiped out most of the stock market's losses Thursday, leaving the Dow Jones industrial average down just 25 points. The Dow had been down as much as 177 points but came back sharply at the end of the day.

News Corp. Confirms Plans to Split Company in Two

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. said Thursday that plans to split into two separate companies, one holding its newspapers and the other its entertainment operations. The Murdoch family, which controls nearly 40% of the voting shares in News Corp., is expected to maintain control of both.

Why China Doesn't Like Barbie, Best Buy or DIY

U.S. companies see China as a market of near limitless potential, but plenty of big names have learned the hard way that the American way doesn't always sell in Shanghai. From Mattel to Home Depot, here are some notable attempts that got lost in translation.

How I Turned a $45 Stock Into a $60,000 Nest Egg

Victoria O'Hara didn't learn anything about how to manage money growing up. But thanks to help from a relative, she got a financial education, began investing slowly, and parlayed small stock buys into a healthy portfolio. Here's her story: