taxpayers money

Bankruptcy Bonuses: Another Way Execs Cheat Workers, Taxpayers

If you thought the sordid tales of bankers at bailed-out Wall Street firms getting big bonuses were bad, consider this: At Hawker Beechcraft, executives may get paid millions in bonuses for driving the company into bankruptcy and looting its pension fund.

Treasury's Big Stake Weighs on AIG's Stock Price

During the past month, AIG stock fell nearly 10% drop after an announcement that the government would sell some of its stake in the insurance giant. The Treasury's ownership in the company has declined from 92% to 77%, but the prospect of its future sell-offs are holding the stock down.

GM IPO Brings In $11.7 Billion for the U.S. Treasury

The initial public offering of General Motors last week netted $11.7 billion for the U.S. Treasury, which invested taxpayer money into keeping the then-struggling automaker solvent during the financial crisis as part of its Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Was Washington Right to Bail Out GM and Wall Street?

Historians will look back on Washington's bailout of GM and Wall Street as the right move. That's because it's now clear that the costs of doing nothing would have been far higher, and it turns out that taxpayers may suffer only limited losses on this economic Hail Mary pass.

Buffett Will Bank $3.5 Billion for Saving Goldman

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett extracted onerous terms from Goldman Sachs when he saved it from a potential meltdown. Two years later, Wall Street is healthy again, Goldman wants Buffett out of its hair, and he's looking at a $3.5 billion profit on that $5 billion lifeline.

AIG Finalizes Its Plan to Repay the U.S. for Bailout

After months of planning, AIG announced Thursday that it had entered into an agreement with the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York about how it will repay in full its obligations to the U.S. government and regain its independence.

AIG Prepares for First Bond Offering Since Bailout

American International Group is laying the groundwork for its first debt offering in two years, an offering that could be a key test of whether investors think the insurance giant can stand on its own and ultimately repay U.S. taxpayers for its bailout.