tarp

GM IPO Brings In $11.7 Billion for the U.S. Treasury

The initial public offering of General Motors last week netted $11.7 billion for the U.S. Treasury, which invested taxpayer money into keeping the then-struggling automaker solvent during the financial crisis as part of its Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Was Washington Right to Bail Out GM and Wall Street?

Historians will look back on Washington's bailout of GM and Wall Street as the right move. That's because it's now clear that the costs of doing nothing would have been far higher, and it turns out that taxpayers may suffer only limited losses on this economic Hail Mary pass.

Budget Deficit Unexpectedly Narrowed in October

The U.S. government started the new fiscal year on the right foot, posting $140.4 billion deficit in October, the first month of the new fiscal year. That was substantially lower than the $148 billion deficit that had been forecast.

Bank of America May Pay Employee Bonuses in Stock

As Bank of America continues to cope with fallout from the housing and mortgage crisis, the financial institution may have to pay some year-end employee bonuses in the form of stock because of a possible cash shortfall related to its buy-back of stock from the federal government.

GM Could Get $45 Billion Tax Break, Thanks to Bailout

General Motors may receive a tax break worth as much as $45.4 billion under the terms of its government-financed restructuring. The credit is a final benefit from the company%u2019s multi billion-dollar government bailout. Under the terms of the bailout, GM will be able to apply a tax credit related to previous losses and business expenses to future earnings.

Homeownership Rate Stuck at 11-Year Low

Despite efforts to keep people in their homes and record-low interest rates, the homeownership rate remains at 1999 levels, according to the Census Bureau.

Buffett Will Bank $3.5 Billion for Saving Goldman

Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett extracted onerous terms from Goldman Sachs when he saved it from a potential meltdown. Two years later, Wall Street is healthy again, Goldman wants Buffett out of its hair, and he's looking at a $3.5 billion profit on that $5 billion lifeline.

TARP Investment Earned Taxpayers 8.2% in Two Years

The TARP bailout of financial firms has yielded a return of 8.2% in two years. This return, $25.2 billion on an investment of $309 billion, beats that offered by U.S. Treasuries, high-yield savings accounts and certificates of deposit, Bloomberg News reported.

Citigroup Earnings Beat Wall Street Estimates

Citigroup on Monday morning reported third quarter net income of $2.2 billion, topping Wall Street estimates and marking its third consecutive quarterly operating profit. Citi shares were up as much as 2.3% in premarket trading.

2010 U.S. Budget Deficit Comes in Below Expectations

Investors received another sign Friday that the U.S. economy is continuing to heal: The 2010 U.S. budget deficit came in at a smaller-than-predicted $1.29 trillion. Though it was still the second-highest deficit on record, the numbers reflect growth in tax revenues, and thus in the economy.

Report: Treasury Outsourced Foreclosure Bailout

The government%u2019s efforts to stem the foreclosure crisis may have been hampered by its reliance on Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, according to a new report. The two mortgage giants have "a history of profound corporate mismanagement," and were overly reliant on subcontractors, the report by the Congressional Oversight Panel said.

TARP Draws to a Close Next Week, With Lower Costs Than Thought

After countless angry political speeches and the threat of economic collapse, the government%u2019s $700 billion bailout of banks, insurance companies and auto companies draws to a close Sunday - and it will likely cost only a fraction of what was expected. It will be years before it is possible to produce exact figures related to the bailout, which encompassed everything from mortgage finance colossuses Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac to auto company General Motors.

AIG Finalizes Its Plan to Repay the U.S. for Bailout

After months of planning, AIG announced Thursday that it had entered into an agreement with the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve Bank of New York about how it will repay in full its obligations to the U.S. government and regain its independence.

GM's IPO Size Likely to Shrink

At an anticipated $16 billion, General Motors' pending initial public offering was expected to be the second largest in history. Now, the No. 1 U.S. automaker is revising IPO expectations downward, anticipating it will bring in $8 billion to $10 billion when shares go public in November.

Overhaul May Transform Mortgage Giants Fannie and Freddie

Mortgage finance giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac may not even exist in their current forms after a revamp of the U.S. housing finance system, Assistant Treasury Secretary Michael Barr said on Tuesday. Moreover, "private gains will no longer be subsidized by public losses," he said.

Two Years After Lehman:
Still Too Big to Fail

"It felt like the world was on fire," recalls financial writer Andrew Ross Sorkin, whose book Too Big To Fail covers the crisis at its peak. In an interview, he discusses the meltdown, its aftermath, the quest for power on Wall Street and why more regulation is still needed.

Can America Get a Return On Its GM Investment?

GM filed for an IPO this week, which means that the U.S. government will soon be able to start selling off its 61% stake in the automaker. So what are the odds that the taxpayers will break even on their $42 billion gamble in General Motors, and what would it take for them to do so?

AIG Prepares for First Bond Offering Since Bailout

American International Group is laying the groundwork for its first debt offering in two years, an offering that could be a key test of whether investors think the insurance giant can stand on its own and ultimately repay U.S. taxpayers for its bailout.

Treasury to Sell 1.5 Billion More Shares of Citigroup

The U.S. Treasury Department announced that it's planning to sell another 1.5 billion shares of Citigroup common stock, part of its effort to recoup some of $700 billion it invested in bailing out the financial system.

Obama Signs Financial Reform Legislation Into Law

After more than a year of wrangling by Congress to craft legislation, President Obama signed the Wall Street and Consumer Protection Act into law Wednesday at ceremony in Washington. The new regulations are viewed by many analysts as the most sweeping reforms to hit the financial industry in more than half a century.

Pay Czar Feinberg to Ask for Stronger Clawback Provisions

Wall Street "pay czar" Kenneth Feinberg will ask several financial firms to strengthen so-called clawback provisions, but will not force them to recover bonuses paid at the height of the financial crisis, CNBC reported. Clawback provisions allow companies to reclaim compensation given to employees if, for instance, the employee is found to have caused significant losses for the firm.

Treasury Rushed GM, Chrysler Dealers to Close

The Obama administration's auto industry task force failed to fully consider how many jobs would be lost at car dealerships when it rushed General Motors and Chrysler into bankruptcy last year, a report issued Sunday says.

2008 Meltdown Vs. the S&L Crisis: Which Was Worse?

In the late '80s and early '90, more than 1,000 savings & loans failed in a financial crisis that cost the government $220 billion to resolve. By contrast, it looks like TARP will only cost the government $105 billion. So is the current financial crisis only half as bad? Not bloody likely.

Congress Scraps Bank Tax in Wall Street Reform Bill

Congressional negotiators agreed late Tuesday to abandon a $19 billion tax on banks after Republicans balked over the measure. Instead, lawmakers agreed to increase FDIC bank premiums and use the savings from ending the $700 billion TARP program early to pay for the bill.