tarp

Treasury Has Sold Its Last Shares of AIG (and Turned a Profit, Too)

The Treasury Department said Tuesday that it has sold all its remaining shares of AIG, wrapping up the government's biggest bailout of the financial crisis. With this sale, the government has received $22.7 billion more than the $182 billion in support it provided to AIG during the crisis.

Dear President Obama: Sell the Government's GM Stake Now

Dear Mr. President: I know you're proud of the effort made by your team back in 2009 to save General Motors. You should be. But as good as this GM thing has been for you, with the election now over, it's time to let go and direct the Treasury to sell its stake in General Motors.

Uncle Sam's GM Investment Is Still Coming Up Short

The Treasury says it expects to lose more than $25 billion on its bailout of the auto industry -- mostly on its GM investment. But we've also been told GM paid back the Feds. How does this add up, and what has to happen for taxpayers to get their money back?

Government Motors: Why Won't D.C. Sell Its GM Stock?

Thanks to TARP loans that saved GM, the Treasury ended up with a major stake in the world's largest automaker, and it still holds 500 million shares -- 32% of the company. Here's the reason it won't be selling them any time soon.

GM Posts Record Earnings: Is It Ready to Repay Bailout?

2011 was the most profitable year in General Motors' history. Thanks in large part to the $50 billion government-assisted restructuring it received, GM's U.S. operation is in good shape. So is it ready to fully pay back Washington now? Well, that depends on Europe.

Bank Bailouts Cost Much Less Than the FDIC Expected

Given the level of public outrage over the government's rescue of banks during the financial crisis, the final cost to the taxpayer of keeping those failed institutions afloat turns out to have been relatively modest: The FDIC has paid out a mere $8.89 billion to 165 banks since the crisis began.

It's Not Too Late to Buy Into the Bullish Stock Market

The S&P 500 has nearly doubled from its post-crash lows, and small investors are finally getting off the sidelines again. Normally, that would be a danger sign for a correction, but right now, all signs point to the upward stock market trend continuing in 2011. Here's why:

Where's an Extra $1 Trillion in Spending Going?

Remarkably, Washington spends $1 trillion more a year now than it did a mere three years ago. But trying to figure out where all that extra money is going is no simple matter. However, a lot of slicing and dicing does yield some answers -- none of which are very satisfying.

House Votes to End 'Car Czar,' 'Pay Czar' Posts

Republicans in the House of Representatives voted Thursday to eliminate the Obama administration's "car czar," as well as the "pay czar" who oversees compensation at companies bailed out with TARP money, and seven other presidential advisers.

GM and Chrysler Will Pay Bonuses to Salaried Workers

Less than two years after they exited bankruptcy, Chrysler Group and General Motors will soon distribute bonuses to salaried employees in recognition of their efforts to help revive the once-flagging Detroit automakers. The payout is likely to anger the companies' unionized workers.

Though Chrysler Is Still Unprofitable, Employees Earn a $750 Bonus

Union employees at Chrysler Group will receive a $750 bonus next week as an acknowledgment of their contributions in helping to revive the once-bankrupt company, the automaker said Monday. Salaried workers, excluding the company's top 50 executives, will also receive the payment.

Citigroup Promotes John Havens to President and COO

Citigroup on Wednesday announced the promotion of John Havens, the head of its Institutional Clients Group, to president and chief operating officer. The move is designed to make the financial behemoth nimbler by cutting the number of executives who report directly to CEO Vikram Pandit.

Bailouts Earn $35 Billion for U.S. Taxpayers

The federal governments bailout program has earned the taxpayer nearly $35 billion in the last two years, The Associated Press said. Income from the Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) rose by almost 17% through November compared with the estimate in October, the AP said.

Bank of America Says It's Ready to Exit TARP

Bank of America has told U.S. regulators that it has met the final condition that was set on its plan to exit the government's Troubled Asset Relief Program. BofA, which repaid $45 billion in TARP funds in December 2009, needed to raise $3 billion in capital by the end of 2010.

Federal Reserve Releases Massive Amount of Bailout Data

The Fed on Wednesday released detailed information about the efforts it took to stabilize financial markets during the recent downturn. The Fed, which is facing increasing criticism from conservatives, defended its actions, and noted that no money was lost on its bailout programs.

AIG Sells $2 Billion in Bonds

Bailed-out insurance giant American International Group sold $2 billion of bonds in its first debt offering since it was rescued in 2008. The offering was an important test of whether investors think the insurer can stand on its own.

TARP Costs Fall to $25 Billion, CBO Says

The much-criticized Troubled Asset Relief Program (TARP) will end up costing the federal government about $25 billion, far less than previously expected. A report from the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) said that the costs will largely stem to funds given to American International Group (AIG), the auto industry and grants intended to avoid foreclosures.

GM IPO Brings In $11.7 Billion for the U.S. Treasury

The initial public offering of General Motors last week netted $11.7 billion for the U.S. Treasury, which invested taxpayer money into keeping the then-struggling automaker solvent during the financial crisis as part of its Troubled Asset Relief Program.