survey

Have You Made a Big Money Blunder? You're Not Alone

A new report reveals that two out of three middle-class Americans acknowledge having made at least one "really bad financial decision" -- at a median cost of $5,000. And that's not the only surprising fact in the results.

What Boomers, Millennials, Elderly All Have in Common: Money Fears

For the past few years, it has seemed like depressing economic news has been America's only actual growth industry, and all that negativity is still echoing in our heads. Across the age spectrum, we're downbeat about the future, even as the signs are finally looking up.

Toyota's Still Tops to Consumers, but Ford's Closing In

Despite its troubles in recent years, Toyota retained its crown in Consumer Reports' annual survey of auto-brand perception, but the survey also showed that Ford is rapidly closing the gap, and other brands aren't far behind.

More People Like Their Banks Than the Government

Despite the din from the Occupy Wall Street crowd, not everybody dislikes financial institutions -- at least, not their own. A new poll shows a much higher approval rating for our banks than we give to the folks in Washington.

Americans Getting More Worried About Retirement

Three separate surveys released this week show rising levels of anxiety among Americans over when -- or whether -- they'll be able to stop working. And even where confidence is rising, some of it may be misplaced.

More Theft in Store for Retailers, Survey Says

The Retail Industry Leaders Association on Thursday reported a nationwide increase this year in shoplifting, calling the fight to stop store crime "an uphill battle." The group blamed an expanding black market for the rise in organized shoplifting crimes.

1 in 4 Spouses Is Willing to Cheat ... Financially

Your sweetheart may be keeping a big secret from you, and it's not that there's some other guy or gal. It's the truth about their money. According to new poll from the National Foundation for Credit Counseling, 24% of respondents wouldn't tell their spouse if they were experiencing financial difficulties.

Tax the Rich? 80% of Young Voters Say 'Yes'

Younger voters are weighing in extremely positively on President Obama's proposal to tax millionaires another $1.5 trillion over the next 10 years. According to a new survey, 80% of Americans under the age of 30 strongly support the move, while less than 9% oppose it.

Young People Pessimistic About Financial Futures

These days, 20-somethings aren't just the young and the restless -- they're the young and the anxious. According to The PNC Financial Services Group's Financial Independence Survey, that demographic is full of financial fears.

Best Cities for New College Grads to Launch Their Lives

As summer's end nears, many of this spring's college graduates are finding they still have no jobs, no apartments, and no obvious prospects. One potential Plan B is relocating, and the fourth annual Top 10 Best Cities for Recent College Graduates survey has some suggestions of where they might go.

Can Your Financial 'Plan B' Withstand the Unexpected?

Having a plan in case of a major life crisis is important and, according to State Farm's Financial Plan B survey, 81% of us know it. But only 45% of those surveyed said they've actually planned ahead for that crisis. If you have a plan, it may not be a solid as you think. And if you don't, here's how to begin creating one.

Half of Us Have Had 'Horrible Bosses': How to Cope

Most Americans don't plot to kill their supervisors like the employees do in the new movie "Horrible Bosses," but nearly half have reason to scream bloody murder. A new survey says a whopping 46% of workers have toiled under an "unreasonable boss." If you've got one, here's some advice.

Job Concerns Soar Among Employed, Unemployed

Employee concerns about layoffs have moved sharply higher according to a new survey by online jobs company Glassdoor. The percentage of those who are worried rose sharply to 22% in the second quarter, the highest that statistic has been since the third quarter of 2009, in the heart of the recession.

The South Offers Most Bang for Cost of Living Buck

Everyday expenses have a direct effect on the price of doing business, which is why CNBC measures the cost of living when it does its survey of the top states for business. So where would a business find a state where the cost of living is low? The survey results point to the South.

World's Millionaires Increased By 8.3% in 2010

Millionaires are back. The number of individuals worldwide with $1 million or more in assets aside from their residence grew by 8.3% to 10.9 million in 2010, topping pre-crisis 2007 levels, according to the World Wealth Report released Wednesday.

Fewer Americans Get Employer Health Insurance

Amid high unemployment rates and rising health-care costs, a smaller proportion of Americans -- less than 45% -- are getting health insurance from their employers, according to a recent Gallup survey.

The New 65 Is 70: Retirement Age Shifts Upward

Almost a quarter of Americans and Canadians say they expect to work past the age of 70, and 6% say they'll likely retire after their 80th birthday -- two years longer than the nations' life expectancy, a recent Nielsen survey found. And it's not just a North American trend.

What's the 'Most Romantic' U.S. City?

In the U.S., which is the most romantic city of all? It depends on who you ask. According to Redbox's list, based on the number of romantic comedies rented, the answer is Greensboro, N.C. Meanwhile, Alexandria, Va., topped Amazon's list based on romantic purchases.

CEO Departures: In January, 96 Top Bosses Moved Out

Last month, 96 CEO changes were announced by U.S. based companies, reports job-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, among them the heads of Google and Advanced Micro Devices. The number is down 9% from December, but 8% higher than January 2010, when 89 CEOs left their corner offices behind.

Even Record Snows Couldn't Stop Shoppers

Much to retailers' surprise, old man winter didn't deter consumers from the post-holiday clearance sales. Merchants posted better-than-expected January results despite the dreadful weather that had caused many analysts to cool their forecasts.