supreme court

Legal Briefing: Court Gives the OK for 'Indecency' on TV

When the FCC decided in 2004 to start fining broadcasters over the use of fleeting expletives, the agency became a caricature of a state censor. Now, the Second Circuit has ruled that the 'indecency' policy was unconstitutionally vague. So what's next for dirty words?

eBay Hit With $3.8 Billion Patent Lawsuit

eBay got slapped Tuesday with a $3.8 billion patent infringement lawsuit over its payment system technology. XPRT Ventures alleges inthe suit that eBay and its subsidiaries PayPal, Bill Me Later, Shopping.com and StubHub violated six of its patents.

Legal Briefing: U.S. Targets More Rich Tax Cheats

Now that they are nearly done squeezing Swiss bank UBS for information about its wealthy tax-dodging clients, the IRS and the Justice Department are moving on to new tax fraud targets: Clients of London-based bank HSBC Holdings, mostly those with ties to India and Singapore.

Legal Briefing: DOJ May Sue to Block Ariz. Immigration Law

The Department of Justice may file suit Tuesday over Arizona's controversial immigration law, but if the lawsuit is crafted as has been rumored, it will frustrate all sides in the debate, because it avoids the merits of the law and focuses instead on Arizona's lack of authority to enact it.

High Court to Rule on Arizona's Other Immigration Law

Though the recently passed Arizona law empowering police to detain suspected illegal immigrants has gotten more attention, on Monday the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to rule on a different, but extremely important Arizona immigration law, one that punishes employers for hiring illegal immigrants.

Tobacco Industry Dodges a $280 Billion Bullet

The Supreme Court will not weigh in on seven tobacco industry appeals, which means that all sides will come out losers to a degree. But by passing on the cases, the justices did the most good for the tobacco industry, which is safe from the threat of having to pay the government $280 billion.

A Clause for Conflict at Heart of Gun Rights Ruling

On Monday, the Supreme Court declared the Second Amendment applies to the states as well as the federal government, which essentially gives all Americans an individual right to possess a handgun. But the constitutional underpinnings of the ruling are shaky -- and potentially revolutionary.

The Supreme Court's Murky Patent Ruling

Can business methods and similar intangible inventions be patented? At what point are inventors seeking to patent mere concepts and principles? Today's Supreme Court ruling didn't really tackle those big questions.

Enron's Skilling Wins Partial Victory, May Get a New Trial

Will Enron ex-CEO Jeffrey Skilling get out of jail? The Supreme Court ruled today on several aspects of his convictions, and it vacated one of them. It's now up to a lower court to review the ruling and decide whether Skilling deserves a new trial.

Conrad Black's Conviction Set Aside

The Supreme Court set aside the conviction of former media baron Conrad Black for defrauding shareholders of Hollinger International. At the heart of these cases was the interpretation of the Honest Services law.

What Enron's Ex-CEO Jeff Skilling Thinks He Did Wrong

Later this month, the Supreme Court will rule on whether former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling will get a new trial, or possibly see his sentence reduced. In the meantime, Fortune has published a sympathetic profile of Skilling in which he describes three key mistakes he feels led to his conviction.

NFL Loses Court Case Over Logo Licensing Deal

For almost a decade, Reebok has had an exclusive license to sell headwear with NFL team logos, but perhaps not for much longer. A unanimous Supreme Court just ruled that the NFL's 32 teams are not automatically exempt from antitrust rules when it comes to granting merchandising licenses.

What Would a Justice Elena Kagan Mean for Business?

Elena Kagan would bring brilliance, hard work, good character and gender diversity to the Supreme Court as the replacement for Justice John Paul Stevens, according to most coverage to date. But her positions on substantive business issues are still pretty much a mystery.

Legal Briefing: Your Name on a Petition Isn't Private

Supreme Court Justices challenged arguments from lawyers trying to keep private signatures on a petition to repeal a Washington domestic-partners law. Also in this roundup of legal news: The first genetic discrimination suit and Wal-Mart's settlement of wage charges.

Jeff Skilling's Bid to Make Dishonesty the Best Policy

The former Enron CEO, who oversaw a company that was fundamentally dishonest, is trying to get the Supreme Court to throw out a law that requires executives to behave honestly. If his lawyers succeed, he'll go free. But Skilling really deserves to stay in jail forever.

Court Removes Limits on Corporate Campaigning

The Supreme Court on Thursday struck down two long-standing limits on corporate spending in U.S. political campaigns by a 5-4 vote. Companies can now use money from their general treasuries to pay for political ads.