supreme court

Why the Supreme Court Should Review Hawaii's Foreclosures

Among the state systems governing foreclosure, Hawaii has a particularly fraud-riddled, draconian process. Suzanne Bonds was unbelievably exploited by the state's foreclosure process in 2004, but Hawaii's courts refused to help. Now, her attorneys have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Fired Fiancee

By a unanimous 8-0 decision, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that anti-discrimination laws forbid employers from firing the fiancee of an employee as retaliation for her complaining about sexual discrimination. Just as interesting as the ruling is why the pro-business wing of the court came down on the side of the employees.

Sorry, AT&T: Corporations Probably Don't Have 'Personal Privacy'

When the government releases documents under the Freedom of Information Act, it still has to protect human beings' personal privacy. This week, AT&T asked the Supreme Court to apply the same privacy principle to corporations. A ruling is months away, but it didn't sound like even the conservative wing of the court was buying it.

Walmart Sex Bias Case Takes Detour to Supreme Court

On Monday, the Supreme Court agreed to decide whether all the female employees who claim Walmart discriminated against them can sue the world's largest retailer as a class, and if they can, whether they can sue for back pay or only for judicial orders to force it to change its behavior.

Can Swatch Stop Costco from Selling Omega Watches?

By buying Omega watches from an overseas distributor, Costco has been able to sell them at well below the suggested retail price. Can Swatch use its copyright to stop Costco? The U.S. Supreme Court's decision could have broad implications for the so-called "gray" market.

Free Speech Vs. Freedom to Mourn: How Will the Court Rule?

It's an ugly case about ugly actions, but it defends some of America's dearest constitutional principles. And when the Supreme Court rules in Snyder v. Phelps, a church that holds anti-gay protests at the funerals of fallen U.S. soldiers will help define the rights of everyone.

Legal Briefing: Big Banks Are Getting Sued by Big Plaintiffs

Some of Wall Street's financial titans are facing lawsuits from equally formidable foes: Billionaire Len Blavatnick is suing JPMorgan Chase for losing $100 million of his money in subprime mortgages, and Norway is suing Citigroup for misrepresenting its financial condition to boost its stock price.

Legal Briefing: Supreme Court Considering Music File-Sharing Case

In today's legal news, the Supreme Court has expressed interest in a case involving a teenager's illegal music file-sharing, the legal battle over stem cell research has already pushed some scientists to other fields, and a third woman has alleged that a Wisconsin DA harassed her with sexual text messages.

Legal Briefing: Obama Backs Utilities in Climate Change Case

Eight states, New York City and three groups won the legal right to sue greenhouse-gas emitting utilities. The companies appealed to the Supreme Court and the Obama administration has filed a brief supporting them. Find out the implications of this move.

Legal Briefing: McDonald's Sued for Too-Hot Chocolate

The infamous McDonald's coffee lawsuit has a sequel. A mother has sued the fast-food giant because too-hot chocolate burned her daughter. But the coffee suit was much stronger than was reported and may bolster the new case.

Legal Briefing: So What If the Prop. 8 Judge Is Gay?

In the wake of Judge Vaughn Walker's ruling that California's Proposition 8 gay marriage ban violated the U.S. Constitution, some are charging the judge was biased because he's gay. But Walker has another set of biases that his detractors would probably prefer not to discuss.

Legal Briefing: Ex-Enron Chief Jeff Skilling Seeks Bail

In the wake of Supreme Court ruling that restricted the use of the "honest services" statute as a basis for fraud convictions, former Enron CEO Jeff Skilling has joined the queue of high-profile corporate convicts asking for bail pending their fraud appeals.

Legal Briefing: Novartis Settles Sex Discrimination Case

Pharmaceutical giant Novartis lost a huge gender discrimination case in May, and faced $250 million in punitive damages, plus possibly hundreds of millions more in compensatory damages. Rather than deal with years of appeals, both sides settled Wednesday for $152 million.

Legal Briefing: Court Gives the OK for 'Indecency' on TV

When the FCC decided in 2004 to start fining broadcasters over the use of fleeting expletives, the agency became a caricature of a state censor. Now, the Second Circuit has ruled that the 'indecency' policy was unconstitutionally vague. So what's next for dirty words?

eBay Hit With $3.8 Billion Patent Lawsuit

eBay got slapped Tuesday with a $3.8 billion patent infringement lawsuit over its payment system technology. XPRT Ventures alleges inthe suit that eBay and its subsidiaries PayPal, Bill Me Later, Shopping.com and StubHub violated six of its patents.

Legal Briefing: U.S. Targets More Rich Tax Cheats

Now that they are nearly done squeezing Swiss bank UBS for information about its wealthy tax-dodging clients, the IRS and the Justice Department are moving on to new tax fraud targets: Clients of London-based bank HSBC Holdings, mostly those with ties to India and Singapore.

Legal Briefing: DOJ May Sue to Block Ariz. Immigration Law

The Department of Justice may file suit Tuesday over Arizona's controversial immigration law, but if the lawsuit is crafted as has been rumored, it will frustrate all sides in the debate, because it avoids the merits of the law and focuses instead on Arizona's lack of authority to enact it.

High Court to Rule on Arizona's Other Immigration Law

Though the recently passed Arizona law empowering police to detain suspected illegal immigrants has gotten more attention, on Monday the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to rule on a different, but extremely important Arizona immigration law, one that punishes employers for hiring illegal immigrants.

Tobacco Industry Dodges a $280 Billion Bullet

The Supreme Court will not weigh in on seven tobacco industry appeals, which means that all sides will come out losers to a degree. But by passing on the cases, the justices did the most good for the tobacco industry, which is safe from the threat of having to pay the government $280 billion.

A Clause for Conflict at Heart of Gun Rights Ruling

On Monday, the Supreme Court declared the Second Amendment applies to the states as well as the federal government, which essentially gives all Americans an individual right to possess a handgun. But the constitutional underpinnings of the ruling are shaky -- and potentially revolutionary.

The Supreme Court's Murky Patent Ruling

Can business methods and similar intangible inventions be patented? At what point are inventors seeking to patent mere concepts and principles? Today's Supreme Court ruling didn't really tackle those big questions.

Enron's Skilling Wins Partial Victory, May Get a New Trial

Will Enron ex-CEO Jeffrey Skilling get out of jail? The Supreme Court ruled today on several aspects of his convictions, and it vacated one of them. It's now up to a lower court to review the ruling and decide whether Skilling deserves a new trial.

Conrad Black's Conviction Set Aside

The Supreme Court set aside the conviction of former media baron Conrad Black for defrauding shareholders of Hollinger International. At the heart of these cases was the interpretation of the Honest Services law.