supreme court

You're Losing Your Right to Sue Big Companies, One TOS at a Time

To celebrate National Consumer Protection Week, we recently highlighted a few quick actions that consumers can take to protect themselves. But the sad fact is that the most potent consumer protection tool -- the class-action lawsuit -- may soon be all but extinct.

The 6 Biggest Busted Bets of 2012

As pundits and politicians rush to sew the year up into a neat little bundle, we decided to look at 2012 from a slightly different angle. Here is our list of the year's worst bets -- six developments that seemed like sure things in January, but were bust by December.

Top 10 Business Stories of 2012

This would be the year when the global economy finally regained its vigor. At least that's what many had hoped. It didn't happen. So what were the top ten business stories of 2012?

Obamacare Could Kill One Type of Cheap Health Insurance

A key goal of the Affordable Care Act was to reduce national cost of health care. But one of its effects may be to eliminate a popular product that cuts Americans' personal health insurance costs: high-deductible health plans.

Stock Market Cuts Its Losses with a Late Rally

A late recovery on Wall Street wiped out most of the stock market's losses Thursday, leaving the Dow Jones industrial average down just 25 points. The Dow had been down as much as 177 points but came back sharply at the end of the day.

Obamacare Upheld: How It Will Affect Your Wallet and Your Life

On Thursday morning, when the Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare was constitutional, there was a brief pause as the country took a moment to imagine what this brave new world would look like. Well, Stop imagining, and let us draw you a picture...

Obamacare in the Balance: Will the Court Ruling Really Matter?

Two years after Obamacare was signed into law, a majority of Americans feel like it's done more harm than good -- possibly because its biggest benefits haven't taken affect yet. But it may have set in motion a shift that even the Supreme Court can't reverse.

Vote for America's Biggest 'Corporate Fool'

As April 1 approaches, Green America wants you to help it choose the "Biggest Corporate Fool" of 2012 -- the worst offender in the realm of business shenanigans. You've probably heard of most of the nominees -- but the behavior they're being called out for may be news to you.

Super PACs: New Rules, But an Old Political Game

Pundits have lately focused on the growth of super PACs -- and the power of the mega-rich men who fund them -- but the current business-sponsored presidential contest isn't unusual: There's a long and rich tradition of election-buying in American history.

Is Sheldon Adelson Trying to Buy the White House?

Casino mogul Sheldon Adelson has stirred up controversy recently for his $10 million in political help to the Newt Gingrich campaign -- but it's all perfectly legal. Still, with billionaires and corporations now able to make almost unlimited political donations, is the presidency for sale?

How to Profit from the Top Potential Crises of 2012

From my point of view, we are about to be in heaps of trouble economically, so for 2012, I'm looking to exploit other people's woes like the good capitalist I am. Here are three bets I might pull the trigger on:

Key Health Care Reform Foe May Soon Be a Customer

Supporters of President Obama's health care reform laws got a major boost when a key opponent lost her business. Mary Brown, whose whose standing to sue is integral to the largest lawsuit against Obama's health care reforms, may be forced to abandon her legal challenge.

Ruling on Cigarette Warnings Stirs Free Speech Debate

A court ruling Monday stubbed out an FDA attempt to plaster extremely graphic warning labels on cigarette packs. The decision has reignited a debate over which right trumps which: The right of the government to warn Americans about the health risks of smoking, or the First Amendment rights of tobacco companies.

Supreme Court Ruling Is Big Win for Video Game Industry

if(typeof AOLVP_cfg==='undefined')AOLVP_cfg=[];AOLVP_cfg.push({id:'AOLVP_us_1027591056001','codever':0.1,'autoload':false,'autoplay':true,'playerid':'61371447001','videoid':'1027591056001','stillurl':'http://www.blogcdn.com/www.dailyfinance.com/media/2011/06/teeny-bikini-284cs060811.jpg','publisherid':1612833736,'width':284,'height':160,'playbutton':false,'bgcolor':''});In a 7-2 ruling, the Supreme Court Monday granted the video game industry some serious leeway, striking down California's ban on the sale of violent video games to minors. Here's more on what it means for the industry.

The Financial Landscape: Big Pharma Wins; So Does Greece

It's a good day to be a drugmaker after two pro-business Supreme Court rulings favored the industry. And it's an even better day for those who are counting on the EU bailing out Greece. But the folks at Google may want to search for "defense lawyers" -- they may be seeing subpoenas shortly.

The Financial Landscape: Wins for Wal-Mart, Utilities

The Supreme Court kept up its corporatist streak Monday, handing down two key decisions that were certain to please the Chamber of Commerce. The first helped Wal-Mart quash a massive class action sex discrimination suit; the second stopped states from suing power companies over greenhouse gas emissions.

Supreme Court Limits Lawsuits Against Vaccine Makers

Vaccine makers such as Pfizer are breathing easier now that the Supreme Court has ruled they can't be sued for defective vaccine designs. The majority opinion by Justice Antonin Scalia was unequivocal: Congress has barred lawsuits over the rare but unavoidable side effects of vital vaccines.

Why the Supreme Court Should Review Hawaii's Foreclosures

Among the state systems governing foreclosure, Hawaii has a particularly fraud-riddled, draconian process. Suzanne Bonds was unbelievably exploited by the state's foreclosure process in 2004, but Hawaii's courts refused to help. Now, her attorneys have asked the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene.

Supreme Court Rules in Favor of Fired Fiancee

By a unanimous 8-0 decision, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that anti-discrimination laws forbid employers from firing the fiancee of an employee as retaliation for her complaining about sexual discrimination. Just as interesting as the ruling is why the pro-business wing of the court came down on the side of the employees.

Sorry, AT&T: Corporations Probably Don't Have 'Personal Privacy'

When the government releases documents under the Freedom of Information Act, it still has to protect human beings' personal privacy. This week, AT&T asked the Supreme Court to apply the same privacy principle to corporations. A ruling is months away, but it didn't sound like even the conservative wing of the court was buying it.