streamingvideo

3 Stocks that May Heat Up Thanks to Netflix's Meltdown

Shares of Netflix are down nearly 50% year to date for a variety of reasons: The loss of its popular Starz content, the price hikes, and the infamous Qwikster debacle. But online video is still a hot market. Here's a closer look at three companies that could profit from Netflix's missteps.

Blockbuster Express Price Hike Hits Home for DVD Renters

Recession-weary Americans trying to save on home entertainment just took another punch in their DVD slots. Blockbuster Express just became the third major distributor to increase its video prices recently -- doubling the fee to rent its semi-new releases to $2 as of Tuesday.

Can Comcast Cope With All the Cable Cord-Cutters?

Don't look now, but the cord-cutting trend continues for Comcast. Though the country's largest cable provider tried to mask its woes with upbeat spin in its quarterly report, Comcast is serving 577,000 fewer households than it was a year ago.

Is Redbox Dumber Than Netflix?

The buck stops here at Redbox. Renting a DVD from one of the disc-spewing kiosks will now set you back $1.20 a night, up from the round $1 price point that Redbox parent Coinstar has promoted for years. It's the wrong move at the wrong time, and the sad clincher is that it's not even necessary.

Can Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Bounce Back?

If Netflix's poorly received rate hike and Qwikster fiasco didn't leave you questioning CEO Reed Hastings' ability to lead the video buffet operator, Monday night's quarterly report should do the trick. But it'll take more than strategic missteps and fumbled apologies to send the CEO packing.

3 Messes That Netflix Needs to Clean Up

The Qwikster jokes are already old, and it's back to business as usual for video buffet operator Netflix -- or is it? Its stock prices are low, and there are lingering questions. But Netflix can make it right with the public again, starting with cleaning up these three big messes it recently made.

Netflix CEO Apologizes, Divides Company

In an open apology to Netflix customers, CEO Reed Hastings took the blame for the price hikes and service changes that generated such negative reactions. He also announced that Netflix was splitting its DVD-by-mail business off under a new name: Qwikster.

Will the iPhone Rule China's 4G Future?

China Mobile, the world's largest wireless company, is in talks with Apple about a 4G-enabled iPhone. If their proposed collaboration on China Mobile's new TD-LTE network and compatible products bears fruit, the rewards for Apple could be enormous.

Starz Falls Out With Netflix: Who Will Take Advantage?

The Netflix Goliath was seriously weakened this week when Starz said it will pull its content from the company's streaming feed in February: Is it time for the industry Davids such as Redbox, Blockbuster and Amazon to pull out their slingshots?

Week in Brief: Gold Shines, Netflix Flies, Data Plans Shrink

This may have been a holiday-shortened trading week, but there were plenty of financial nuggets that kept stocks moving. Let's go over some of the news from Netflix, Verizon, Immucor and more that shaped this abridged week in the markets.

YouTube Draws Nearly 40% of Online Video Visits

YouTube has been a powerhouse in the online video arena since well before Google bought it. YouTube dominates the sector, accounting for nearly four out of 10 online video viewing sessions in the U.S. in May. What's still a question is how much the video-sharing site will add to Google profits.