streaming video

Is Redbox Dumber Than Netflix?

The buck stops here at Redbox. Renting a DVD from one of the disc-spewing kiosks will now set you back $1.20 a night, up from the round $1 price point that Redbox parent Coinstar has promoted for years. It's the wrong move at the wrong time, and the sad clincher is that it's not even necessary.

Can Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Bounce Back?

If Netflix's poorly received rate hike and Qwikster fiasco didn't leave you questioning CEO Reed Hastings' ability to lead the video buffet operator, Monday night's quarterly report should do the trick. But it'll take more than strategic missteps and fumbled apologies to send the CEO packing.

3 Messes That Netflix Needs to Clean Up

The Qwikster jokes are already old, and it's back to business as usual for video buffet operator Netflix -- or is it? Its stock prices are low, and there are lingering questions. But Netflix can make it right with the public again, starting with cleaning up these three big messes it recently made.

Netflix CEO Apologizes, Divides Company

In an open apology to Netflix customers, CEO Reed Hastings took the blame for the price hikes and service changes that generated such negative reactions. He also announced that Netflix was splitting its DVD-by-mail business off under a new name: Qwikster.

Will the iPhone Rule China's 4G Future?

China Mobile, the world's largest wireless company, is in talks with Apple about a 4G-enabled iPhone. If their proposed collaboration on China Mobile's new TD-LTE network and compatible products bears fruit, the rewards for Apple could be enormous.

Starz Falls Out With Netflix: Who Will Take Advantage?

The Netflix Goliath was seriously weakened this week when Starz said it will pull its content from the company's streaming feed in February: Is it time for the industry Davids such as Redbox, Blockbuster and Amazon to pull out their slingshots?

Week in Brief: Gold Shines, Netflix Flies, Data Plans Shrink

This may have been a holiday-shortened trading week, but there were plenty of financial nuggets that kept stocks moving. Let's go over some of the news from Netflix, Verizon, Immucor and more that shaped this abridged week in the markets.

YouTube Draws Nearly 40% of Online Video Visits

YouTube has been a powerhouse in the online video arena since well before Google bought it. YouTube dominates the sector, accounting for nearly four out of 10 online video viewing sessions in the U.S. in May. What's still a question is how much the video-sharing site will add to Google profits.

AT&T's 4G Battle Plan: 15 Major U.S. Cities in 2011

AT&T will spread its 4G LTE network into a large number of U.S. cities this year, a move that puts it into direct competition with Sprint-Nextel's Wimax 4G product and LTE technology deployed by Verizon Wireless. But will its investment in faster wireless pay off?

Should Netflix Stream Its Video Business Into the U.K.?

Netflix is enjoying a period of rapid expansion, riding on the popularity of DVD-by-mail and online video streaming. The question for investors is: What's next? Netflix has signaled that it plans to expand abroad, and the U.K. is a likely target. But is Britain ready for Netflix?

Google Reinvents YouTube Again with Premium Channels

YouTube owner Google is giving the video site a high-class makeover, launching up to 20 premium video channels in a bid to boost revenue. But can a site people think of as the home of laughing babies and funny pets become a destination for web surfers seeking video worth paying for?

After Blockbuster Deal, Dish Is Set to Take on Netflix

Most subscribers to Dish Network probably picked the satellite television provider based on its low cost. But now that Dish has bought the library of one-time movie rental powerhouse Blockbuster, it's poised to compete with the likes of Netflix for the streaming-video market.

Facebook: Writing a Script for Online Movie Consolidation?

Warner Brothers is launching the first streaming-video app that lets people rent movies through Facebook. First up: The Dark Knight. It's a small test, but when Facebook enters a business, competitors get nervous: Here's how this move could trigger a round of mergers among the established players.

In This Corner, Netflix. In the Other Corner. . .Amazon?

Netflix, whose DVD-by-mail service hastened the demise of several video rental chains, may soon find itself under siege from Amazon. The world's largest online retailer appears to be on the verge of launching its own unlimited movie and TV-show streaming service.

No Matter How Successful, Netflix Can't Shake the Bears

Throughout its history as a public company, Netflix has confounded the critics who've said it'll never survive. Yet, the critics still won't let up. And, yes, they have a scarily compelling story now. Here's why 2011 might prove to be Netflix's toughest one yet.

Netflix More Fully Embraces Streaming Video

The mail-order and online movie-rental company said it's shifting its focus to streaming video, raising some prices and launching a streaming-only plan in the U.S. This follows a successful launch of the same plan in Canada. Investors are delighted.

Hulu Drops Price on Subscriptions After Traffic Dips

Hulu lowered the price of its newly launched Hulu Plus subscription service by $2 to $7.99 Wednesday, just days after the online streaming video service saw its rank decline on a closely watched Internet ranking service for the month of October.

Apple's Stealth Assault on the Video Game Market

By now you probably know that the surprise hit of Apple's latest earnings call was the hockey-puck-size AppleTV device. But an unexpected upside for Apple is that AppleTV could be a backdoor entry into the video-game console market. Here's how that would work.

Why Blockbuster Went Bust While Netflix Flourished

It's easy to blame Blockbuster's collapse, which culminated Thursday in a voluntary Chapter 11 filing, on the rise of streaming Internet video and kiosk rental options. But Netflix faced the same threats and it's thriving. So what did Netflix do smarter than its bankrupt rival?

Apple Unveils Tiny New TV Device

At a much-anticipated event Wednesday, Apple announced an overhaul to its Apple TV device and video rental pricing plan. The size of a hockey puck, the new Apple TV box is designed to allow users to stream TV shows and movies withe greater ease and at a lower price. Steve Jobs also discussed new features for Apple's iPods, and a new social network connected to iTunes. (Video from Sam Gustin.)

Google Eyeing Pay-Per-View Movies on YouTube?

Google is talking to Hollywood studios about a pay-per-view video service based on YouTube, according to a new report. The move comes as Google girds for battle with Apple, and telecom and media companies jostle for control over the next generation of high-speed content delivery.

How Consumers Will Take Back the Net in 2010

Thanks to the power of the Internet, it's getting harder for companies to control how we communicate and entertain ourselves. Google's new phone runs an app that enables users to make international calls far cheaper than with any wireless carrier. That's just one sign of growing consumer influence through the Net.