states

Long-Term Care for Elderly, Disabled Has Far to Improve

For the first time, there's a state-by-state scorecard of America's performance in providing long-term services and support to senior citizens and people with disabilities, and the results aren't much to brag about. But they do point the way toward improving the long-term care system -- and saving the nation billions.

Debt-Ceiling Law: States Brace for Another Hit

The debt-ceiling discussions may be over, but the fallout for states is just starting. Many states, still struggling to recover to pre-recession levels, have depended on federal money to make up their shortfalls. As the flow of money slows, which states will take the biggest hits?

The South Offers Most Bang for Cost of Living Buck

Everyday expenses have a direct effect on the price of doing business, which is why CNBC measures the cost of living when it does its survey of the top states for business. So where would a business find a state where the cost of living is low? The survey results point to the South.

Best and Worst States for Jobless Benefits

For the nearly 14 million Americans who want to work and can't find jobs, unemployment insurance is a vital lifeline. But how much help that lifeline is varies widely from state to state. 24/7 Wall St. and DailyFinance crunch the numbers to see which states are the best -- and worst -- places to be unemployed.

Where U.S. Millionaires Will Live in 2020

Prepare yourself for the decade of the multiplying millionaires: By the end of 2020, the number of affluent households that will cross the line into seven-figure status is expected to virtually double the ranks of U.S. millionaires. So where will all that money be going?

State Worker Retirements Are Soaring Across the Country

As wages and benefits shrink, state workers are retiring in droves. On top of all the layoffs, these retirements amount to a huge brain drain of government employees, and the problem is likely to get worse given the yawning budget gaps of states from coast to coast.

Government Workers Aren't Living Large

Though the media often reports on eye-popping salaries of government officials, such as school superintendents and other political appointees, most public-sector workers don't do nearly as well. Typically, they earn about 6% less than workers in the private sector.

College Dropouts Cost Taxpayers Billions

Students who drop out of school before reaching their sophomore year cost taxpayers billions of dollars, according to new research. Taxpayers spent more than $9 billion over five years subsidizing students who didn%u2019t make it to the second year of four-year degree courses, according to new research from The American Institute for Research (AIR).

Treasury Announces $1.5 Billion Small Business Package

The Treasury Department announced a $1.5 billion lending package to boost small businesses at the state level. The money will be available to states that can demonstrate that they will generate $10 in new private lending for every dollar of federal funds they receive, Reuters said. This could create a package worth a total of $15 billion.