social security benefits

Not Much for Social Security Recipients

Social Security recipients, 55 million strong, will get a 3.6% cost of living increase next year. There has not been a cost of living increase from the fund in three years. This one is so small that it may harm consumer spending. It certainly won't help -- another likely drag on GDP.

Social Security to Hand Out First Raises Since '09

Social Security recipients will get a raise in January -- their first increase in benefits since 2009. It's expected to be about 3.5 percent. Some 55 million beneficiaries will find out for sure Wednesday when a government inflation measure that determines the annual cost-of-living adjustment is released.

Dead or Alive: Thousands Mistakenly Declared Deceased

Each year, some 14,000 people are wrongly declared dead by the Social Security Administration, CNNMoney reports. Data-entry errors can lead to major financial turmoil for victims of these mistakes, who they can lose their benefits and credit.

Is Social Security Ripping You Off?

In all the hype and emotion surrounding the debate, it's easy to miss the real point about Social Security -- whether it's worth it for most...

Deciding When to Retire? Consider the Future First

For seniors, delaying retirement can have a big payoff in Social Security benefits. And a new study finds it's easier to decide to wait if you think about the advantages of holding out before you consider the pluses of retiring early.

Your Social Security Benefit: $29.02 a Day

Could you live on less than $30 a day? If you don't have a pension or adequate personal savings, that's what the typical retiree will get in 2036, even setting aside the near-term risks facing Social Security. But don't despair: There are ways to boost your benefits, and ensure that old age doesn't equal penury.

How to Retire Rich Without Relying on Social Security

Even if Social Security weren't falling apart -- which it manifestly is -- the average retiree benefits essentially amount to about what you'd earn working full time at a minimum wage job. That's hardly the retirement lifestyle you want. Here's a plan that will allow you to retire comfortably.

The New 65 Is 70: Retirement Age Shifts Upward

Almost a quarter of Americans and Canadians say they expect to work past the age of 70, and 6% say they'll likely retire after their 80th birthday -- two years longer than the nations' life expectancy, a recent Nielsen survey found. And it's not just a North American trend.

Another Year With No Social Security Benefit Increases

Inflation has remained flat, and that means Social Security recipients will get no increase in their benefits this year. As medical costs keep growing -- and after a proposed Social Security bonus failed to win approval -- that's unlikely to make retired voters happy.

Stimulus Program Sent Checks to 89,000 Dead, Incarcerated People

The federal government sent out checks to 89,000 dead or incarcerated people in 2009 as part of the $814 billion stimulus program, a watchdog reported. One component of the stimulus plan was the distribution of $13 billion by the Social Security Administration, The Washington Post said. The money was to go to 52 million eligible beneficiaries in checks of $250 each.

Investing at 60: Pacing Yourself for a Long Retirement

Personal finance expert Jean Chatzky has reached the last post in this series, aimed at those of you who are age 60 and over -- or interested in a little advance planning. Here are your tips for making that nest egg last as long as you do.

No More Do-Overs for Social Security?

A provision created to allow retirees to correct the mistake of tapping their benefits too early has been used by some as a fairly lucrative investment strategy. Now, the Social Security Administration wants to put an end to the practice.

Legal Briefing: Race and College Admissions

In 2003, the U.S. Supreme Court held in Grutter v. Bollinger that race could be a "plus factor" considered in school admissions. On Tuesday, the 5th Circuit Court of Appeals will hear arguments in the first case to ask precisely what that means.

Public Confidence in Social Security on the Wane, Poll Says

Public confidence in the social security systems is on the wane, according to a USA Today/ Gallup poll. Six out of ten non-retirees think Social Security won%u2019t be able to pay them benefits when they stop working. Three-fourths of those aged 18 to 34 don%u2019t expect any kind of social security check when they retire. A majority of retirees also say they expect their current benefits to be cut.

10 tax tips for seniors

Every year about this time, I receive a lot of mail from seniors who are confused about whether they should file a tax return. The confusion stems...