saving

It's International Women's Day: How Does the U.S. Wage Gap Compare?

Happy International Women's Day, America: Overall, your women are doing pretty well. But when it comes to wage equality -- how much women earn compared to men -- the land of the free and the home of the brave ranks a startling 61st worldwide, behind nations like Madagascar, Cambodia and Guyana.

Want Security? Don't Invest...Save!

Want to retire with security to spare? Check out fixed rate annuities -- a way to save your way to security, rather than investing your way to an empty bank account.

'Coupon Index' Suggests Tough Times Ahead

Consumers are clipping coupons at a rate not seen since before the 2007 recession. If you believe the "coupon index," that may be a sign of trouble ahead for the economy.

U.S. Consumer Spending Rose 0.8 Percent in September

Americans increased their spending in September at twice the rate that their income grew, a sign of confidence in the economy. Still, consumers made up the difference by saving less for a third straight month, a troubling trend.

6 Key Money Lessons of 2011: What We've Learned

At this time last year, maybe you thought the economy would be a bit more gracious by now. No such luck. But as we reflect on the year that was, here are six financial lessons that 2011 taught us all.

Retirement Anxiety Spreads Among the One Percent

When it comes to retirement, apparently even the well-to-do are wallowing in anxiety. A new survey of the affluent from Wells Fargo & Co. reveals that the wealthy are losing sleep over their lack of preparation for the good old days down the road, much like the less monied crowd.

Girl Scouts Teach Girls to Get Real About Money

Those Girl Scouts aren't just about selling cookies -- the green-sashed entrepreneur who supplies your Thin Mints is also preparing to be the boss. The GSA now offers 13 merit badges to teach its more than 3 million members financial literacy -- everything from good credit to savings and investing.

Millions of Us Are Throwing Away Free Money

In these tough times, why would anyone pass up money for nothing? Inquiring minds at FINRA want to know -- because many of us are. According to research by Aon Hewitt, nearly 30% of 401(k) participants are not contributing enough to scoop up their full employer match.

11 New Rules for Fiscal Survival in a Weak Economy

That simple wait-and-see game plan we adopted when we believed recovery was just around the corner? Not cutting it anymore -- if it ever did. It's time for new strategies to win in the New Normal. Here's a rundown of ideas that once worked to which it's time to say goodbye, and the current wisdom for replacing them.

What to Do First: Save or Pay Down Your Debts?

For many households, it's a personal fiance dilemma: Should they try to pay down debt first, or build up savings? In the aftermath of the Great Recession, opinions have clearly tipped toward the ditch-your-debt side. But that's not always the right answer.

How to Pick a CD That
Works for You

As the stock market continues to spook investors, many are fleeing to the safety of bank certificates. Here's why they're looking good now and how to pick the right one for you.

Where Do You Go for Cash in a Pinch?

Most Americans may need to save more money for emergencies. A poll by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling found that less than half of Americans say they would turn to their savings accounts when hit with an unexpected bill.

Can Your Financial 'Plan B' Withstand the Unexpected?

Having a plan in case of a major life crisis is important and, according to State Farm's Financial Plan B survey, 81% of us know it. But only 45% of those surveyed said they've actually planned ahead for that crisis. If you have a plan, it may not be a solid as you think. And if you don't, here's how to begin creating one.

Dani Johnson Offers Her 12 Laws for Creating Wealth

Multimillionaire businesswoman and business coach Dani Johnson made plenty of mistakes and hit more than a few speed bumps on the road to her success. But those difficulties taught her a few things about how to make money, how to keep it, and how to turn it into your slave.

Six Financial Myths Your Father May Have Taught You

You love your dad, but you don't have to buy everything he taught you about money. DailyFinance celebrates Father's Day by debunking six financial myths he might have held held true. He still deserves the socks and the cologne. Just don't necessarily trust him with your portfolio.

Recession Sobers Once Spendthrift Teens

Guess what the recession hath wrought: A little teen sobriety. According to the just-released 2011 Teens & Money Survey from Charles Schwab, nine out of 10 teens say they were "affected by the recession," causing major shifts in perspective that include a greater appreciation for what they have and an increased awareness of financial hardship.

Six Ways to Avoid Common Retirement Planning Pitfalls

More than half of American workers have less than $25,000 saved for retirement, but having too little set aside is just one of many ways you can sabotage your later years. We examine some oft-made financial planning traps -- and the safe paths around them.

Five Ways Women Sabotage Their Financial Futures

While both men and women are prone to a variety of costly financial blunders, many women seem to be plagued with a gender-specific set of tendencies that sabotages their relationship with money. Here's are women's most common financial missteps -- and how to avoid them.

Money Skills Your Teen Needs

Teens might think they know it all, but how much do they really know when it comes to money? The U.S. Department of Treasury is partnering with the...

Want to Become a Saver? Check These 10 Best Online Resources

If you wish you could become a saver and investor, but you don't know where to begin, the Alliance for Investor Education wants to help: As part of its America Saves Week, the AIE has released its list of the top 10 online resources to help consumers build up their savings.

Don't Lose Retirement Savings to 401(k) Fees

New disclosure rules don't go into effect until next January, but in the meantime you could be paying far too much in savings-sapping fees. The two challenges here are figuring just what your plan's fees are, and are they fair? Here's how to get that info.