salaries

Dear American Companies: Here's How to Fix the Economy

In 1914, a business executive named Henry Ford did a startling thing: He announced that he was going to more than double the wages he was paying his employees. The country was as shocked by this then as it would be today.

College Degree Worth It? What the Data Say

The combination of the high price of college and the less-than-promising job prospects for new grads are fueling a hot debate about the value of a bachelor's degree: Is it worth the money? The Census Bureau parsed the data, and found that of all the variables that effect lifetime earnings, nothing packs the punch that education does.

To Understand the Weak Hiring Stats, Look in the Mirror

The vast majority of American businesses are privately held, run by ordinary people with all the same worries the rest of us have. And if you're cutting back on personal spending at home, how likely are you to feel comfortable hiring at work?

Why Not to Pick a Major Based on a Salary Chart

This week, researchers at Georgetown took the nation's humanities majors to task for making such unlucrative choices in college. But their report takes too shallow a look at the results of not becoming an engineer. Former Latin American Studies major Loren Berlin offers a wider take on the real value of a B.A. in the humanities.

Rising Expenses Cut Into Wells Fargo's Outlook

Wells Fargo's stock dropped by about 5% after it announced its earnings last month, due to lower than expected home mortgage originations. While rising interest rates could be one factor, non-interest expenses were up by $616 million from a year ago. If those expenses stay that high, Trefis will be cutting its target for the stock.

Are Maiden Names Really Worth $500,000?

Forget about cash-stuffed wedding envelopes. A Dutch study suggests brides could pick up an extra half million dollars by doing nothing -- specifically, by not changing their names. Women who kept their maiden names were judged to be more professional, were more likely to win a job, and attracted higher pay, the study showed.

Can the Tea Party Platform Reduce Unemployment?

The U.S. set the forces of globalization in motion, and now more than ever, it's clear we're suffering the consequences: high unemployment, stagnant or declining incomes, and rising costs for goods. Can the policies of the surging Tea Party provide solutions, or will they just make matters worse?

Why a Little Inflation Is a Good Thing for Americans

Inflation has inched higher in the past six months, but that's not a danger sign, but rather a harbinger of improving economic conditions and a strengthening recovery. And that, in turn, should lead to higher wages and more hiring in the year ahead.

The Impact of Better Teachers: $100 Trillion More in U.S. GDP

A new study says top-performing teachers turn out students who learn more than the students who had the worst teachers. And that extra learning has a huge impact on earnings -- and the nation's economy. Still, some educational experts say the study raises more questions than it answers.

The Employment Cost Index Deserves a Closer Look

The employment cost index increased just 2% in 2010, and the trend will likely continue in 2011. Those contained employee costs will help maintain a low-inflation environment that should give the Fed more time to stimulate the economy through its asset-purchase program.

Well-Educated Women Pay a High Price to Have Kids

Highly skilled women will lose about a quarter of a million dollars, or as much as a third of their lifetime earnings, by choosing to have a child, making the prospect of raising a family a far more expensive one for college grads than their less-educated counterparts, a new study shows.

Is a Degree From a Top College Worth the Price?

For years now, private college tuition has risen far faster than inflation, a fact that colleges have used a fancy theory called Baumol's Law to explain away. Unfortunately for families who pay over $200,000 to send a child to one of those schools, the comparative value of the education rarely justifies the higher price.

Record Corporate Profits Are Coming Out of Workers' Hides

The Commerce Department reports that U.S. corporate profits have hit historic highs, so why isn't the GOP -- the party of business -- celebrating? After all, those profits are coming not from revenue growth -- which would benefit workers and executives -- but from cost cutting.

Hurd's Salary as Oracle President: $950,000

Mark Hurd will receive an annual salary of $950,000 and a bonus of as much as $10 million for fiscal 2011 in his new position as president of Oracle (ORCL), according to a regulatory filing. Hurd, who resigned as CEO of Hewlett-Packard (HPQ) last month over allegations of falsified expense claims, will also have the option to buy 10 million shares in Oracle, and a further 5 million shares in each of the next five years.

Are U.S. Defense Contractors Abandoning California?

Boeing's plan to relocate two major defense programs from California to Oklahoma could signal the start of a major shift in the locations of defense contractors, and how they work. For the areas attracting the companies, it's about jobs. For the contractors, it's about remaining competitive.

Pay Raises Are Smaller Than Expected This Year

Workers who got less of a raise than they anticipated this year aren't alone. A new Hewitt survey of large companies finds the nation's slack recovery has prompted many employers to rein in expenses, thereby reducing planned raises and bonuses.

Where you go to school DOES matter

From the pages of the Wall Street Journal this morning (subscription required) comes a new survey that reveals what we've all long suspected. Where...