research and development

SAP Knows: You Spend Money to Make Money

SAP showed healthy revenue growth in its recently announced first quarter earnings, but operating profits increased by far less. Why? Because the company is putting more money into operating expenses and R&D, which sets it up for bigger profits in the longer term.

Pfizer Sells Capsugel: Will More Asset Sales Follow?

On Monday, Pfizer announced it would sell its Capsugel business to private-equity firm KKR for $2.375 billion. If the hints the drugmaker has been giving lately are true, the move could be the start of two years of major asset sales. Here's what's ahead for the world's biggest pharmaceutical company.

Google's Future: Can Larry Page Make It a Winner Again?

Google has been dead money for the last year -- up just 3% vs. 12.6% for the S&P 500. The Internet giant's biggest problem is its inability to diversify its revenue sources. Author Peter Cohan pulls out his Innovation Quotient to suggest how new CEO Larry Page might correct that.

Top-Selling Drugs About to Lose Patent Protection

The pharmaceutical industry is about to fall off a cliff -- a patent cliff. Over the next few years, some of the world's most popular and lucrative medicines will go off patent, and generic competition will siphon an estimated quarter of a trillion dollars from companies' bottom lines. Here's a rundown:

Pfizer Joins Other Pharmas in Giving a Cautious Outlook

Pfizer reported fourth-quarter earnings on Tuesday that nearly quadrupled from a year ago as revenue rose 6%. But it also lowered its sales guidance for 2012, due to some of its bestselling drugs going off patent. What's ahead for the world's biggest drugmaker:

What Pfizer Sees in Lpath's Innovative Blindness Drugs

Lpath focuses on developing therapeutics that target bioactive lipids for treating a range of human diseases, including cancer and diseases that cause blindness. Its promising drugs have attracted attention -- and lots of money -- from Pfizer. More of both could be coming.

The Autism Study Fraud's Impact on Scientific Research

Aside from the embarrassment, researchers know deceptions like the autism research fraud can have much larger consequences, both for the parents of autistic children and for the future of their studies. Says one prominent scientist: "It taints a lot of very good work that goes on."

J&J Unit to Develop Blood Test to Find Cancer Cells

Teaming with Massachusetts General Hospital and others, J&J's Veridex is developing a novel method of isolating cancer cells from a patient's bloodstream. If successful, the blood test could ultimately replace more invasive and painful ones such as biopsies.

New Management Guide Also Offers Value to Investors

Prestigious management consulting firm McKinsey & Co. just published 'Value: The Four Cornerstones of Corporate Finance,' a guide to help executives create shareholder value. Lead author Tim Koller shares his thoughts with DailyFinance about how the book might also help investors profit.

General Electric to Invest $2 Billion in China

General Electric, the global conglomerate whose businesses include consumer and business financing, power generation, household appliances, aircraft engines, medical imaging and media content, said it plans to invest more than $2 billion in China through 2012 in research and development, technology and financial services partnerships.

R&D Spending Fell in 2009 for the First Time in a Decade

Corporate America took a tightfisted approach to its future last year, leading to an overall 3.5% decline in research and development spending at major industry titans, the first such drop in over a decade, according to a Booz & Co. survey cited by The Wall Street Journal.

Novartis Halts Two Drug Development Programs

Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis announced Tuesday that it had discontinued the development of two drugs -- the hepatitis C treatment Zalbin, and antifungal agent Mycograb. The company will take impairment charges of approximately $590 million in third quarter of 2010.

Despite Howls, Leo Apotheker May Be Just What HP Needs Now

Wall Street has been quick to punish Hewlett-Packard after the computing and software giant named former SAP chief Leo Apotheker as its new CEO on Sept. 30. But if SAP's culture says anything about what HP will be like under Apotheker, it may get back to making bets on innovation. Wall Street has been quick to punish Hewlett-Packard after the computing and software giant named former SAP chief Leo Apotheker as its new CEO on Sept. 30. But if SAP's culture says anything about what HP will be like under Apotheker, it may get back to making bets on innovation.

Sanofi-Aventis Inks 10-Year R&D Deal with Covance

French pharmaceutical company Sanofi-Aventis announced a 10-year agreement with Covance on Thursday under which the Princeton, N.J.-based contract research firm will provide it with drug development services. Sanofi-Aventis will pay Covance between $1.2 billion to $2.2 billion.

Obama Pushes His New Stimulus Plan

President Obama is speaking in Cleveland Wednesday, laying out more details of his plan to get the economic recovery back in gear: $50 billion for infrastructure spending; a $100 billion R&D tax credit; and $200 billion to induce U.S. companies to make capital improvements now rather than later.

Obama's Business-Friendly Proposals Aim to Quiet His Critics

Recognizing that voters are worried about the economy, President Obama is offering an olive branch to his critics with a $50 billion infrastructure plan and a deal to make the R&D tax credit permanent. Conservatives say it's too little too late, but the game is far from over for the Democrats.

Hefty U.S. Funds to Jump-Start Electric-Car Sector

Federal funds will help create a big-enough manufacturing base to produce up to 500,000 electric cars yearly by 2015, according to the Energy Department. The funds, part of the economic stimulus program, will also boost the U.S. share of global battery production to 40% by 2015.

How Misleading GDP Raises Risks

The 3.5 percent GDP increase in the third quarter signaled to many that the recession had ended. But that figure was revised downward to 2.8 percent, and revised again to 2.2 percent: a 37 percent reduction that calls into question the data collection process and the value of these 'headline' numbers.