research in motion

This Week's Biggest Technology News

Netflix's dramatic reversal, a cash-crunched wireless carrier, a desperate handset maker, blessings from Europe for Microsoft, and Steve Jobs: The Motion Picture. This is the stuff that will dominate high-tech headlines in the coming days. Here's what to watch as the week unfolds.

BlackBerry Blues: Why Apple's a Better Bet Than Research In Motion

Everyone but Research In Motion seems to know that many of today's BlackBerry owners will be on Android or iPhones by the time their two-year service contracts run out. RIM may have a beefy base of users now, but it might be smart to check again in a year or two.

Last Week's Top Tech News

Buyouts, bum guidance, and a broadening decline for a one-time titan made up the top tech news this week. Here's a closer look at two stocks that soared and two that soured.

Layoffs Leave Everyone Worse Off

Corporate executives stick to a script when pulling the layoff lever: Cite the tough economic landscape, promise that employees will remain the firm's most valued asset, insist that there was no other option to protect the company's future. Here's why you shouldn't buy what corporate America's selling when it comes to life-ruining layoffs.

RIM Unveils BlackBerry Social Music Service

Research in Motion needs a hit, badly. The once-formidable smartphone maker has been dominated by Apple and Google of late. Is its new social music service well-crafted enough to attract the young customers the company so obviously covets?

What's Wall St. Thinking?: Donuts Debut, AT&T Data

Wednesday's IPO by the underwhelming Dunkin' Brands saw the company open at $19 before closing out the week nearly $10 a share higher. It's hard to see the appeal of this slow-growth business. But that's not the only bewildering, boneheaded development from last week on Wall Street.

Why Are Rich Companies Laying Off Poor Workers?

Several major corporations have been announcing layoffs in recent weeks, despite their fattening coffers. What accounts for all the pink slips? Consumers don't like them, nor do investors -- at least, not the farsighted ones. Here are the real reasons behind these puzzling, and troubling, terminations.

Is BlackBerry Maker RIM Ripe for a Rebound?

Investors have abandoned Research In Motion, which may finally make it a good investment again. Twenty months ago, the smartphone company's shares traded at $85. The stock now changes hands at around $49. But there are good reasons to expect that it won't stay that low for long.

RIM Takes a Risk with BlackBerry Messenger App

Research In Motion's plans to make its superb BlackBerry Messenger service available as an app on Androids and iPhones will get its signature software in front of a wider audience. But will RIM's initiative win new customers, or cannibalize its already failing market share?

Apple Surpasses HP in Mobile PC Sales on iPad Popularity

Apple leapfrogged Hewlett-Packard to become the largest U.S. seller of portable personal computers last quarter because of the popularity of its iPad tablet computer that it debuted last year, according NPD Group's DisplaySearch.

Apple Apps Revenue is Up, But its Market Share's Down

Apple more than doubled its revenue from its mobile-device applications last year, though its global share of that market slipped slightly as applications for Research in Motion's BlackBerry and Google's Android mobile-computing platform chipped away at Apple's leadership, according to a report released Tuesday.

Kodak Loses Early Ruling in Patent Dispute with Apple and RIM

Kodak has accused Apple and Research in Motion of infringing on one of its digital-imaging patents with the iPhone and BlackBerry smartphones. But the International Trade Commission in Washington has ruled against Kodak in a preliminary decision.

Android OS Gains in Smartphone Race as All Others Slip

Apple's iPhone operating system software stumbled in the third quarter, losing year-over-year quarterly market share for the first time, as Google's Android mobile operating system pulled further ahead, according to a Gartner Research report released Wednesday.

Goodbye BlackBerry, Hello iPhone

Employees who are tried of carrying both a company issued BlackBerry and a personal smart phone are pushing their employers to allow their personal devices onto corporate networks. Unfortunately for Research In Motion, employers seem to be listening.

Android Tops iPhone, BlackBerry Among Recent Buyers

Google's Android mobile operating system is now more popular than Apple's iPhone or RIM's Blackberry among recent smartphone buyers, according to new data from market research firm Nielsen. The sales figures are further evidence of the astonishing rise of Android devices.

Motorola Buys Location-Based Software Firm Aloqa

Motorola is snapping up location-based software maker Aloqa as part of its strategy to differentiate its smartphones with the help of software. Aloqa's technology pushes information to smartphone users about events or special offers from merchants near their locations.

It Could've Been You: Five Wrongly Convicted People

Some of the best reads for investors from around the Web, including posts about the market rising in spite of the Hindenburg Omen, 10 high-yield stocks and signs we're in a depression instead of a recession.

Google's Android to Become World's No. 2 Mobile OS

Google's Android mobile operating system continues to make major inroads in the cell phone market, and will shoot from a mere 3.9% global market share in 2009 to an estimated 17.7% this year, ahead of RIMM and Apple, according to a new report from research firm Gartner.

Mobile Apps Hold Promise for Ad Revenues, Profit

Americans' thirst for more applications for their hand-held devices will overcome any resistance they have to mobile advertisements, creating a profit opportunity for both applications publishers and operating-system owners, according to two separate reports published this week.

Face-Off on Stocks: Research In Motion, Nokia, Motorola

Not too long ago, Research In Motion, Nokia and Motorola each enjoyed the sort of market-dominating mojo that Apple and Google boast today. But all three have slipped badly and their shares have tanked. The question now, is whether these companies can regain lost ground and if their fallen stocks are now good values.