renminbi

The Financial Landscape: Dollar Losing Favor, Economy Losing Steam

The long term isn't looking good for the greenback: Central bank managers don't see it keeping its status as the world's reserve currency. The short term's not looking so hot for the U.S. economy either: Housing prices are down another 4% year over year, and confidence is falling.

A New Way to Bet on China: Open a Renminbi Bank Account

China's economy is booming, and Western nations are increasing their demands that its currency be allowed to rise to its natural value. Who knows if that will happen, but if you want to bet that it will, the Bank of China just made it easier: Now, Americans can open renminbi-denominated accounts.

Currency Wars Are Heating Up Across Latin America

Emerging market countries, especially those in Latin America, are gearing up for a potentially damaging round of currency interventions to help keep their economies competitive. "This is a currency war that is turning into a trade war," says Brazilian Finance Minister Guido Mantega.

Caterpillar to Issue Renminbi-Denominated Debt

Heavy equipment manufacturer Caterpillar is marketing a two-year 1 billion renminbi bond to institutional investors in Hong Kong. It's only the second multinational company to test the waters of the "dim sum" market, and its offering is five times the size of the first, a bond from McDonald's.

As the Dollar Weakens, Commodities Shine

Market watchers lately have loudly proclaimed the end of the dollar, which has left investors looking to stay ahead with a choice of betting on stocks, which have 17% fallen in the last decade, or staying "safe" in very low-yield money market funds. But there is an alternative: Commodities.

Yuan Hits High Vs. the Dollar as China Nudges Exchange Peg

The Chinese yuan hit a post-revaluation high against the dollar Monday after the People's Bank of China set the yuan's reference rate for trading at its highest level since the central bank began publishing the daily fix in 1994. The yuan can rise or fall 0.5% each day from the reference point.

China Won't Let Yuan Float So Freely After All

Last month, China said it would loosen the tight link between its currency, the yuan, and the U.S. dollar. It was a move welcomed by economists and world leaders who felt China was engaging in unfair currency manipulation. But on Wednesday, the government in Beijing backpedaled a bit.

Chinese Yuan Hits High Against Dollar

China's currency climbed on Friday to its strongest level yet as the country's central bank set its daily official level to new highs against the dollar ahead of the G-20 summit. Beijing had vowed to let the currency fluctuate more, a move that was welcomed by many of the world's large economies.

China's Currency Move Means Hard Decisions Ahead

If you think China's decision to unpeg its currency from the U.S. dollar was a good move for both countries, Gary Shilling says don't believe it. The economist who saw the subprime crisis coming warms that the move isn't what it appears to be, and says it will have a number of unintended consequences.

China Promises More Flexibility on Yuan

China's central bank said it will allow more flexibility in the exchange rate of its currency, the yuan. This seems intended to help foreign economies as China's shows increased strength. Critics have said an undervalued currency gives China an unfair trade advantage.