recovery

The Demographics Behind the Boom in Working from Home

As the economy picks back up, more and more people are working from home. The number of home-based U.S. businesses will grow by more than 10% over the next four years, and the number of telecommuters will rise by 12%. But that's not all based on the recovery: Many are victims of the recession.

Are Investors Ignoring All the Good News?

With all the tragedy dominating the news these days, it's easy to be pessimistic. But the cold, hard facts about the economy actually paint a more optimistic picture.

Now Creating Jobs in America: Emerging Markets

Beware of the constant metaphors used to frame the world economy as if it were a war or zero-sum competition. Investors should remember that economies cooperate as much as they compete when it comes to how things work on the world stage. The current U.S. manufacturing boom is a case study.

As IPOs Revive, Should You Be Joining In?

After a few comatose years following the financial crisis, the IPO market is roaring back. And with names like Facebook and Groupon driving the rumor mill, smaller investors are wondering if how to get in on the action. The answer: Carefully, thanks to the risks.

Obama's Cuts: Less Than Meets the Eye, Thankfully

A parade of Republicans immediately lined up to attack the president's proposed budget cuts this week, claiming the plan falls short of making a real difference. They're right. And that's good, because really deep cuts are the last thing the economy needs right now.

Consumer Sentiment Jumps to Highest Level Since June

It was another decent week for the U.S. economy as initial jobless claims fell below the psychologically significant 400,000 level, and the consumer sentiment index rose to its highest level in eight months, indicating that Americans are increasingly confident that better days are ahead.

In Construction, a Year of Flat Growth Would Be Welcome

If you want to see how the construction industry will do in 2011, look at how the architects did in 2010. By that gauge, last year's thin uptick in spending on building design and engineering services foretells a similar small gain ahead for builders -- and after two years of steep declines, any growth at all is welcome news.

Consumers, Not Stocks, Will Feel Inflation's Pain First

Amid a bounce back in manufacturing activity, surging commodity prices are leading to fears of inflationary forces. Those forces are real, but corporate profits -- and therefore, stock prices -- won't suffer too quickly. The pain for struggling Americans, though, could be rapid and severe.

IMF Lays Out the Challenges Ahead for Global Recovery

In its latest report, the IMF applauds national policymakers for stabilizing credit markets and putting the global economy on a recovery track. However, thorny problems remain -- including how to prevent overheating in emerging markets, and how to cut the U.S. deficit while lowering its unemployment rate.

Spin, Not Substance, Is Just What Investors Need Now

With the economic recovery gaining steam, President Obama's State of the Union address -- and the GOP response -- should be seen as a shift to a less activist approach. Feel-good rhetoric may be wiser than heavy-handed policies that could easily backfire.

December Sales Will Warm Merchants' Hearts

Shoppers didn't disappoint merchants, buying presents at both low- and high-end prices, from jewelry to shoes. Most analysts predict sales will show year-over-year increases of 3% to 4% on Thursday, when major chains post December figures and holiday totals.

A Rising Economy Is Pushing Down Treasurys

Doomsayers insist the recent rapid rise in yields signals the nation's creditors finally getting fed up with financing U.S. deficits. But a stronger argument can be made for blaming the better-than-expected economic reports that have been piling up recently.

The Missing Keys for America's Economic Engine

With U.S. consumers continuing their saving spree, repaying debts and remaining hesitant to spend like they did during the boom times of earlier years, there is little to indicate that there will be a meaningful economic recovery in the U.S anytime soon.

Rising Oil Prices Won't Derail the Economic Recovery

Yes, oil prices are climbing again and will likely do so for a while. But never fear: The price forecasts remain too low to make a big impact on the U.S. economy, which is far more energy-efficient these days. Here are three other reasons.

Holiday Shoppers Keep Their Plastic in Their Pockets

Retail sales have perked up in November and December, but consumers aren't resuming their old habit of using credit cards to splurge on gifts. According to a new poll, more than half of American adults say they're sticking with cash this holiday shopping season.

A Dose of Bah, Humbug for Holiday Sales Growth

Major retailers are reporting healthy gains in November revenues, adding more evidence that holiday sales will be significantly higher than last year. But reading that as a sign of a wider economic recovery may be giving too much credit to what turns out to be a tiny sliver of U.S. GDP.

Oil Prices Rise 3% on Improved U.S. Economic Outlook

Oil prices rose Wednesday as reports of higher U.S. productivity and more domestic hiring combined with continuing growth in demand from China to offset the effects of lackluster economic data from other countries.

Spain to Sell Stake in State Lottery as Debt Crisis Looms

With the fears of a European sovereign debt crisis growing worse, the Spanish government said Wednesday that it's taking several measures to stop the fiscal contagion from reaching its shores, including selling a 30% stake in its national lottery business, Bloomberg reported.