pew research center

The Impending Economic Cliff Almost Nobody's Talking About

Washington Post reporter Michelle Singletary calls it the "caregiver cliff." It's what will happen to the U.S. economy as a result of tens of millions of caregivers "taking time off from work, and thus risking their jobs, or tapping into their limited resources to provide care."

Young Adults are Too Broke to Get Loans

Young adults are in less debt than they were a decade ago, but it's not because they've suddenly become fiscally responsible. It's because their shaky economic status keeps them from qualifying for loans.

Suffering from Crisis Fatigue, Americans Tune Out Sequester

President Obama is going all out to warn Americans about what could happen if the sequester hits. The country's response: a collective yawn, as we assume that after the political grandstanding, a deal will be struck as usual. But that may not happen this time.

What Kate's Royal Pregnancy Is Reminding Us About Raising Kids

The announcement of Kate Middleton's pregnancy this week was joyous for the Windsor family and royal-watchers alike. But all the fuss around the story hides an uncomfortable truth: For many of us, having an heir is getting unaffordably expensive and folks feeling the pinch are putting it off.

The Real Source of the Middle Class' Money Woes

There are many reasons the middle class feels squeezed right now: unemployment, underwater mortgages, rising college tuition. But it's a combo of three other factors that made the 2000s a lost decade for average Americans: declining household income, shrinking net worth, and a smaller middle class.

The Recession's Unexpected Gift: Reviving Multigenerational Living

Living in multigenerational households isn't a new phenomenon: It was the norm for centuries, and in much of the world, it still is. But the financial pains of the Great Recession are pushing more of us back into into such homes -- and that could be an excellent thing.

Surprise! Technology Has Made Us More Bookish

The boom in e-readers and tablets -- such as the iPad, Nook and Kindle -- has resulted in Americans starting to read more books, according to a new study from the Pew Research Center.

It's Official: Wealth Gap Is Our No. 1 Source of Conflict

Do you think that the biggest conflict in America today is between the rich and the poor? If so, join the club: According to a recent Pew Research Center poll, 66% of Americans believe the wealth gap is the greatest cause of tension in this country.

Senators Take Aim at Bank Accounts' Fine Print

Practically nobody ever reads the disclosures that came with a bank account, and that's no surprise -- they average 111 pages long. That's way too much fine print, say Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) and Jack Reed (D-R.I.), who are calling on banks to cut those disclosures down to just one easy-to-comprehend page.

Will Latinos Drive the Housing Recovery?

More than any other demographic, Latino homeowners were slammed by the mortgage crisis: Two-thirds of total Hispanic wealth in the U.S. evaporated from 2005 to 2009. But as the fastest growing demographic in the nation, they are also well positioned to power the housing rebound.

Obama's 2012 Budget: Why Federal Spending Needs to Be Raised, Not Cut

President Obama's proposed spending plan seeks to slash $1.1 trillion from the deficit over the next decade. Republican House Speaker John Boehner says that's too little. In fact, the cuts go too far in the wrong direction: With the economy still recovering, Obama should raise federal spending.

Growing Public Support for Tax Package

Gallup, Pew Center and Washington Post/ABC News surveys all showed that Americans, for the most part, support the tax package approved by the Senate on Wednesday.

Poll: Americans Split on Control of Congress

Americans are evenly split on which political party should control Congress, while about a third of likely voters are apathetic, according to a Pew Research Center poll released Monday.