personal computers

Buy HP, Sell Dell

You won't find too many fans of HP stock right now, after last week's announcement about the death of the TouchPad. But PC makers are going through a rough patch in general, as consumers turn to tablets and businesses embrace the cloud. Here's why HP is still a decent bet -- and in better shape than a certain competitor.

Reports of the PC's Death Greatly Exaggerated

Personal computer sales fell 1.1% in the first quarter compared to the same period in 2010, according to industry research firm Gartner, but while its report lists a few possible reasons for the decline, none are compelling, and the drop is unlikely to presage a serious decline in PC sales.

Ken Olsen Remembered: Lessons of a Great American Entrepreneur

Ken Olsen, the MIT-educated inventor who founded DEC in the 1950s and built it into multi-billion dollar company, died on Sunday. In addition to inventing the minicomputer, Olsen was a pioneer as a manager. But perhaps the most valuable lesson his life can teach regards his one business blind spot.

Gartner: Tablets Will Cut Into PC Sales in 2010 and 2011

Research company Gartner slashed its forecasts for global computer shipments in 2010 and 2011, saying that growing demand for tablet devices will eat into personal computer sales. PC shipments this year will rise 14.3% to 352 million units, Gartner said, according to Reuters. Gartner forecast that shipments will increase by 15.9% in 2011.

Intel Unveils an $8 Billion Plant-Building and Hiring Plan

Building a new chipmaking plant and upgrading four others will result in thousands of construction and high-tech jobs, the world's leading supplier of microprocessors said today. It's a strong statement from a company that has been critical of Washington's business policies.

HP's Management Crisis: Where Rivals Have Openings

Although HP's rivals have been quiet, the Mark Hurd fiasco has to smell like blood in the water around Silicon Valley. Where exactly might HP be most vulnerable? And where might it still hold an edge? Here's a business-by-business rundown.

Some Big-Name Tech Stocks Look Temptingly Cheap

In this uncertain market, investors are shying away from the usually risky techs, but that has left several promising companies with low valuations. Here's a look at some of the top names in tech that could offer a rare opportunity.

AMD's Earnings Follow Intel, With a Solid 45% Jump

Not to be shown up by rival Intel's (INTC) blockbuster earnings this week, Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) on Thursday reported a second-quarter 45% net income increase. The chipmaker's strong earnings signals a return to the product demand for PCs and services, and overall technology spending.

With Businesses Buying PCs Again, Dell Could Prosper

After PC buying stalled during the recession, it's time again to replace those old machines. Such buying kicked in during the second quarter, and it's buoying expectations that Dell's sales and earnings growth will regain badly needed vigor.

Intel Is Poised to Set the Pace for Tech Earnings

Investors are looking for a strong showing from the bellwether chipmker, which would offer further evidence that U.S. companies -- and tech firms in particular -- are continuing to emerge from the recession. Analysts expect Intel to come through.

Face-Off on Stocks: BP, Nokia, Hewlett-Packard

With so many blue-chips beaten down so mercilessly in this season of selling, some buys must be out there, no? Here's a look at three potentials: BP, Nokia and Hewlett-Packard. Are they cheap -- or cheap for a reason?