news corp

News Corp. Countersues Heinz in Advertising Clash

Heinz and Rupert Murdoch's News Corp have sued each other in two different federal courts, a sign that an advertiser mutiny against News and its alleged monopolistic practices is spreading. Previously, News was sued by Dial Corp over similar allegations.

Market Minute: Time Warner Cable Wins Dodgers TV Deal

Time Warner Cable has won a contract to carry Los Angeles Dodgers games for at least the next two decades starting in 2014, snatching the games away from Fox Sports after this year's baseball season ends, according to a person familiar with the matter.

We're Watching Less Network TV: Guess What We're Doing Instead

Fresh data from ratings tracker Nielsen shows an alarming drop in television viewership. ABC, Fox, CBS and NBC have combined for a 9 percent drop in viewers in the coveted 18-to-49 age bracket since the fall season began. Media executives are worried, and rightfully so.

This Week's 5 Best Moves and Blunders in Business

Companies can do brilliant things, but there are also times where they fall flat on their faces. Sometimes CEOs can save the day, but at other times, they say and do the darndest things. There were plenty of winners and blunders this week: These were my favorites.

The Yankees Score Big with a $1.5 Billion TV Deal

The New York Yankees are a money-making machine and on Tuesday, the company's television subsidiary cashed in. The YES Network is selling 49 percent of its business in a deal that values the network at $3 billion. And the numbers get even bigger from there.

Newsweek to End Print Edition, Go All Digital

Newsweek plans to end its print publication after 80 years and will shift to an all-digital format aimed at online users starting in early 2013. Job cuts are expected. Newsweek's last U.S. print edition will be its Dec. 31 issue.

News Corp. Confirms Plans to Split Company in Two

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. said Thursday that plans to split into two separate companies, one holding its newspapers and the other its entertainment operations. The Murdoch family, which controls nearly 40% of the voting shares in News Corp., is expected to maintain control of both.

SmartMoney Cashes Out: Popular Financial Magazine Bites the Dust

Say farewell to SmartMoney. The glossy yet insightful monthly magazine isn't dying for a lack of readers: It has more than 800,000 subscribers. But with ad sales floundering and expenses rising, Dow Jones has been forced to turn it into an online-only publication.

Did Warren Buffett Just Save the Newspaper Industry?

Last week, Warren Buffett moved to save Media General, paying $142 million to buy 63 of its struggling newspapers. The move helps backstop the newspaper industry, giving it breathing room to figure out a way to survive in the Internet age.

As Facebook Files for Its IPO, a Look Back

On Thursday, Facebook finally filed for its IPO. As the site that made it possible for you to reconnect with your third-grade girlfriend moves into the next phase of its life, we decided to look back at some of the high points in Facebook's brief but captivating history.

How Facebook Timeline May Poke Holes in Your Privacy

Facebook's new Timeline program allows users to review everything they've ever shared on Facebook and showcase what they think is most worth remembering. It's fully customizable -- but there are some downsides.

Score! NFL to Grab $7 Billion a Year in Broadcast Deals

The NFL has something broadcasters lust after: a reliably strong source of ratings. So as its football games migrate onto smartphones, iPads, and anything else with a screen, its no surprise that CBS, Fox and NBC -- not to mention Sirius, Westwood One Radio and Verizon -- are all lining up to pay billions to carry them.

Will a Pay Cut for Homer Mean the End of 'The Simpsons'?

Television viewers may have to start preparing for a Sunday night Fox lineup without "The Simpsons." America's crassest cartoon family is fighting with the company over money and may end up moving out of the network's neighborhood if the tiff isn't settled.

The Week's Top Technology News

Buyouts, bum guidance, and a broadening decline for a one-time tech titan top the week in review. Go inside the stories that prompted this week's big buys and sells in the nexus between Wall Street and Silicon Valley.

New Details in Hewlett-Packard Pretexting Case

In 2006, tech giant Hewlett-Packard grabbed headlines as it found itself immersed in the middle of a stunning pretexting scandal that would force high-profile resignations, lead to public distrust and plenty of legal action. Since then, the case seemed to have died down. But not so fast ...

Saudi Prince to Build World's Tallest Tower

Saudi Arabia's Prince Alwaleed bin Talal -- a rich investor who holds stock in many of the world's largest companies, including Citigroup and News Corp. -- has announced his next investment: the world's largest tower.

Men vs. Women on Money: Polls Reveal Odd Differences

Men's lifestyle website AskMen's Great Annual Survey polled men on a host of subjects: Careers, relationships and -- most important for us at DailyFinance -- their financial opinions. Then they teamed with Cosmopolitan to get the female point of view. And some of the gender disparities were pretty striking.

MySpace Markdown: Social Site on Sale for 94% Off

Back in July 2005, the deal seemed so promising. Rupert Murdoch's News Corp bought MySpace parent Intermix Media for $580 million. The social media pioneer was, by some measures, the fifth most-visited website in the U.S. This week, MySpace may be sold for as little as $30 million.