new york

A Boat, A Scot, and the World's Most Expensive Whisky

In honor of its 125th birthday, Glenfiddich -- the world's top-selling single malt scotch is auctioning off the most expensive whisky in the world. Only eleven bottles exist of Janet Sheed Roberts Reserve, a 55-year-old scotch.

The 5 Bank Stocks Facing the Biggest Legal Risks

Aftershocks from the financial crisis are still hitting U.S. banks: They're getting sued over everything from bonds stuffed with fraudulent home loans to improper foreclosures to credit card fees. Here are the five banks with the most to lose from those lawsuits.

Poor and Elderly: The 5 Worst States to Grow Old In

It's a tough time to be old in America, and it's worse than you may realize: According to a recent report, on average, if government benefits were taken out of the equation, the elderly would have far less income than they'd need to survive. Here's where the problem is worst.

Linsanity Trips Time Warner Cable: Can it Rebound?

There is no shortage of winners when it comes to the surprising ascent of basketball star Jeremy Lin: the Knicks; Madison Square Garden Inc.; the fans; the NBA; Linsanity T-shirt sellers. But the loser has been Time Warner Cable, and its losing streak could last awhile.

Top 4 Staffing Stocks for an Improving Economy

The U.S. economy has suddenly shifted into a higher gear, and "help wanted" signs are popping up at many more companies. That's great news for the whole staffing industry, but these four firms could benefit more than most.

As Facebook Files for Its IPO, a Look Back

On Thursday, Facebook finally filed for its IPO. As the site that made it possible for you to reconnect with your third-grade girlfriend moves into the next phase of its life, we decided to look back at some of the high points in Facebook's brief but captivating history.

NYSE Merger with Deutsche Boerse Blocked by EU

The EU has blocked the Deutsche Boerse's planned merger with NYSE Euronext, a deal that would have created the world's largest financial exchange operator, because the venture would have had a near-monopoly in the trading of European derivatives.

Doing Good to Do Well Gets a Legal Boost in California

You might not yet have heard of "B corporations" -- these companies with the dual missions of boosting social good and generating profits are a relatively new idea. But thanks to a recent California decision to make that social mission legally binding, the idea is poised to really take off.

All Couples Are Not Created Equal in the Tax Code

Equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender Americans is often viewed as a moral issue, or a religious one. But in many ways, it's a financial issue, as well -- one that leaves same-sex couples paying thousands of dollars more every year to the IRS in taxes.

The 10 Worst States to Retire In: They're Frosty and Costly

TopRetirements.com has named the 10 worst states in which to retire based in factors such as taxes and climate. Every retirement is unique, but before you end up living out your golden years chilly and underfunded, check out this list.

OWS Prepares to Occupy Martin Luther King Jr. Day

It's been a rough few months for the social justice activists of Occupy Wall Street. But on Sunday and Monday, the movement will take to the streets again to honor one of America's most famous protesters: Dr. Martin Luther King.

Why You Need to Be Your Own Stock Analyst

Sell-side analysts are often criticized for acting too slowly when it come to downgrading companies and lowering estimates. That means if you rely on the experts, you'll be reacting late too.

Don't Skimp on Your Divorce: Lesson from a N.Y. Bigamist

Of all the regrets commonly expressed by the recently divorced, "I'm sorry I didn't pay my lawyer more money" is probably last on the list. But for one New York woman, the decision to go cheap on the legal fees led to a nasty surprise as she found herself with two husbands.

Stocks in 2012: Up, Up, But Not Away

The stock market's stomach-churning roller coaster will keep running, but unlike last year's flat finish, Wall Street experts anticipate stocks will end 2012 on a high note, with the S&P 500 up by 7%.

Bad Holiday Sales Leads to Sears, Kmart Store Closings

Sears Holdings on Tuesday reported a sharp drop in holiday sales compared to a year ago, and said the results will force it to close 100 to 120 Sears and Kmart stores. The company said the stores to be closed have yet to be identified.

U.S. Homes Lose (Only) $700 Billion in Value in '11

The year-end housing news is sobering: U.S. homes are expected to lose more than $681 billion in value in 2011. But there's an upside: That's 35% less than the $1.1 trillion lost in 2010, according to research from Zillow.

Celebrity Marriages: They Should Have Gotten the Prenup

"To leave hundreds of millions of dollars vulnerable does not seem like a wise choice," says one matrimonial lawyer. Still, many of the rich and famous keep heading down the aisle without a prenup. It's a choice some eventually live to regret.

Wall Street's Hurricane Irene Contingency Plan

When it comes to bold weather-related boasts, it's hard to beat the Post Office's unofficial motto: "Neither snow nor rain nor heat nor gloom of night stays these couriers from the swift completion of their appointed rounds." Yet even the USPS pales beside the standard set by the New York Stock Exchange: Wall Street hasn't closed for weather since Hurricane Gloria in 1985.

Gas Stations Run Dry as East Coasters Prepare for Irene

Gas stations along the Eastern Seaboard experienced high demand Friday and some sold out of fuel as Hurricane Irene bore down and residents scrambled to evacuate. In Norfolk, Va., one Exxon station was sold out by noon, its windows boarded up as attendants readied themselves for the storm.

Big U.S. Cities Added 7.3% More Millionaires in 2010

The ranks of those who can call themselves rich city slickers have grown a bit thicker. Reflecting the global surge of millionaires, the United States' 10 wealthiest urban areas produced 7.3% more high net worth individuals in 2010, Capgemini announced Tuesday in its U.S. Metro Wealth Index.

The 10 U.S. Cities Where Parking Is Most Expensive

City dwellers know that finding an affordable downtown parking spot involves cutthroat competition. And in some urban centers, even the winners pay through the nose for a place to stash their cars. Find out where the rates are worst (and the high price we all pay for "free" parking.)

The Texas Surge: Is America Headed South?

For more than two centuries, the Census Bureau has plotted America's population center, mapping a steady progression of westward and southward growth. With a boom in Texas and busts on the coasts sending the center South, what does the new center say about the nation's future?

Layoffs Are Back as Public Sector Workers Get the Ax

Massive layoffs were both a cause and a symptom of the recent recession, but job creation began to revive late last year. Unfortunately, in May, the U.S. added only 58,000 jobs, and layoffs may be on the rise again. This time, they're taking a particular toll on state and local government workers.

What Would the Rapture Do to Real Estate Prices?

Christian broadcaster Harold Camping miscalculated in his prediction that the world was going to end on Saturday. But he's not the only one who thinks the Rapture could be nigh in the not-so-distant future. Which begs the question: Where will those who are left behind hang their hats?

Jackpot! States With Biggest Lottery Payouts

Lotteries are big businesses in most states, and they can provide windfalls for both the winning ticket-holders and state coffers. But which states give the most back to ticket-holders and through government services?

Home Exchanges: Why Pay When You Can Swap?

Summer is around the corner, but vacation budgets for many families are tight. Still, a bit of belt-tightening doesn't have to mean giving up your dream vacation if you're able to escape the costs of a hotel and car rental. Now could be the time to take a leap of faith and try a home exchange or swap.

High Heating Oil Prices Continue to Drain Wallets

Winter in the Northeast was particularly brutal this year, but not enough to account for the likely record prices. Blame crude oil's recent price jump for that. But the pain could become even worse if Obama's proposed cut in low-income energy subsidies passes.

California's SolarCity Sees a Bright Market on the East Coast

California-based solar panel installer SolarCity has announced its second East Coast deal in a month: It's buying the residential solar business of Vermont-based groSolar, hard on the heels of its purchase of Maryland's Clean Currents. And SolarCity isn't the only West Coast solar player looking toward the sunrise for growth.