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How Airlines Prepare for Heavy Weather Like Winter Storm Nemo

As the Northeast braces for Winter Storm Nemo, airlines are already employing a strategy that has served them well: Cancel flights early and keep planes, crews and passengers away from snowed-in airports. Here's what else the airlines are doing.

Markets Cautious Ahead of Debt Ceiling Vote

Stock markets traded cautiously on Wednesday ahead of a U.S. vote on raising the nation's borrowing limit temporarily. The House is set to vote on a motion to increase the nation's $16.4 trillion borrowing ceiling for three months.

Germany Is Bringing Home the Gold: 1,950 Tons of It

A German newspaper reports the country's central bank will repatriate parts of its massive gold reserves worth about $200 billion at current market rates from storage sites in the United States and in France.

Boehner Caves, Agrees to Hurricane Sandy Aid Vote on Friday

Under intense pressure from angry Republicans, House Speaker John Boehner agreed late Wednesday to a vote this week on aid for Superstorm Sandy recovery. He will schedule a vote Friday for $9 billion for the national flood insurance program and another on Jan. 15 for another $51 billion in aid.

Oil Prices Rise as Fiscal Cliff Recession Fears Recede

The price of oil jumped by more than a dollar on Wednesday, to above $93 a barrel, after U.S. lawmakers passed legislation to avoid a fiscal cliff that could have pushed the world's biggest economy into recession, and reduced global demand for energy.

Top 10 Business Stories of 2012

This would be the year when the global economy finally regained its vigor. At least that's what many had hoped. It didn't happen. So what were the top ten business stories of 2012?

Should New Yorkers Get a Break on Their Federal Income Taxes?

To bring the federal deficit down, taxes must go up on the rich. But "rich" means very different things in different parts of the country. You need not pity the poor Wall Streeter just scraping by on $1 million -- but average New Yorkers really are getting disproportionately slammed by the tax man.

The Weirdest Things Your Taxes Pay For

Sen. Tom Coburn has released his Wastebook 2012, a look at over $18 billion in projects that are bizarre and hard to justify. Admittedly, that's just a drop in the federal budget. But ... Thoreau-based video games? Robot squirrels?! Take a peek at our gallery of weird government expenditures.

Avon to Cut 1,500 Jobs; CEO Says Layoff Will Stabilize Company

Struggling beauty products seller Avon said late Tuesday it will cut about 1,500 jobs and exit the South Korea and Vietnam markets. The job cuts amount to almost 4 percent of its workforce and are one of the first major moves by CEO Sheri McCoy, who in April replaced longtime CEO Andrea Jung.

Delta Air Lines Buys 49 Percent Stake in Virgin Atlantic

Delta Air Lines said it will buy almost half of Virgin Atlantic for $360 million as it seeks a bigger share of the lucrative New York-to-London travel market. Landing rights at London's Heathrow Airport are limited, and the deal is a way for Delta to expand its foothold there.

Stock Futures Moving Higher as Budget Talks Proceed

U.S. stock futures are moving higher on optimism over a deal on the U.S. budget ahead of a high-level meeting between the Treasury chief and Senate leaders, as well as improving unemployment and economic growth numbers.

The Best U.S. Cities for Retirees

When choosing where to retire, there are lots of factors to consider beyond fun in the sun. Good health care, cost of living, low crime rates, and a host of cultural aspects come into play. So where should you set your sights? Kiplinger and the Martin Prosperity Institute pick out some winners.

Power Outages After Sandy Weren't Unusually Long After All

As the days without power stretched on for hundreds of thousands after Superstorm Sandy, patience turned to anger. But an AP analysis of outages from other big storms shows that the time it took to utility companies to restore electricity was no worse than average -- and in some places, actually faster.

Stock Futures Edge Up After Year's Biggest Sell-Off

U.S. stock futures are recovering a day after the largest drop on the Dow Jones industrial average this year. Trading is light ahead of the Labor Department's report on claims for unemployment benefits.

Sandy Highlights the Wealth Gap, Forces Rich to Drink Good Wine

A hurricane can be the ultimate equalizer. No matter where on the socio-economic spectrum they stood before the storm, its victims afterward had many of the same needs: food, shelter, electricity and flushable toilets. But some "necessities" are of a more sophisticated nature.

Northeast Air Travel Still Stalled, Thousands of Flights Cancelled

Hurricane Sandy grounded more than 18,000 flights, and it will be days before travel gets back to normal. Authorities closed the three big New York airports, and the ripple effects from the shutdown of the nation's busiest airspace are dramatically affecting travelers in cities far and wide.

Postal Service Keeps Delivering Mail Through Hurricane Sandy

As Hurricane Sandy began tearing up the East Coast, thousands evacuated their homes, schools closed, and millions of businesses and government offices told their workers to stay home. But a few employers did not: the Supreme Court, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, Home Depot, Lowe's, and the U.S. Postal Service.

Hurricane Sandy Leads Companies to Postpone Earnings Reports

A number of major U.S. companies postponed quarterly earnings reports Monday as Hurricane Sandy bore down on the East Coast and financial markets were closed: Among the biggies waiting until the rain stops: Pfizer, Thomson Reuters, NRG Energy, and Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia.

Hurricane Sandy Closes All U.S. Stock Exchanges

The New York Stock Exchange will close its trading floor Monday as Hurricane Sandy barrels its way up the Northeast, but Big Board trading will continue electronically. NYSE Euronext said Sunday it is putting in place its contingency plans beginning Monday and will announce later when the trading floor will reopen.

Oil Prices Retreat to Near $85 a Barrel Thanks to Plentiful Supply

Ample supplies helped send oil prices down to near $85 per barrel on Friday.Benchmark oil for December delivery was down 80 cents to $85.25 a barrel at late afternoon Bangkok time in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. Oil hasn't been that low since July 10.

Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago?

It's the question every incumbent up for reelection has had to answer since challenger Ronald Reagan first posed it to President Jimmy Carter in 1980. But in this 2012 campaign, the answer is not so simple, for all the rhetoric on both sides.

JPMorgan Hit With Fraud Lawsuit Over Bear Stearns Securities

The New York attorney general's office has hit JPMorgan Chase & Co. with a civil lawsuit, alleging that investment bank Bear Stearns -- prior to its collapse and subsequent sale to JPMorgan in 2008 -- perpetrated massive fraud in deals involving billions in residential mortgage-backed securities.

Dow Closes at Highest Level Since 2007 on Fed Stimulus News

The stock market staged a huge rally after investors got the aggressive economic help they wanted from the Fed. The Dow finished up more than 200 points at 13,540, its highest level since December 2007, the start of the Great Recession.