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America's 10 Worst States for Fraud

When times are hard, fraud often gets worse. Americans are under great financial pressure, and there is no shortage of criminals waiting to take advantage of it. 24/7 Wall St. examined the 10 states that had the most per-capita fraud complaints.

The 10 States That Pay Out the Biggest Lottery Jackpots

On Friday night, a Mega Millions jackpot of more than $500 million is in the offing. Somebody may win big. Now, the only guaranteed winners of lotteries are state treasuries. But we're betting you're more interested in your own odds of winning a lottery, and where the payouts are best.

The 10 Worst States to Retire In: They're Frosty and Costly

TopRetirements.com has named the 10 worst states in which to retire based in factors such as taxes and climate. Every retirement is unique, but before you end up living out your golden years chilly and underfunded, check out this list.

Out of Work Man Asks: Should I Pay Off My Mortgage?

Nicholas, 60, is a paralegal who has been jobless for more than a year, and is worried about the possibility of losing his home in rural Pennsylvania. If he depletes his savings and cashes out of a life insurance policy, he can pay off his mortgage. But is that the smartest move?

Helping a Caregiver Climb Out of Debt

Joe did right by his mother in her declining years, but half a decade of expensive care for her has left the 53-year-old in a financially precarious position. Money and Happiness columnist Laura Rowley offers him a step-by-step plan to get out of debt and back on track for his own retirement.

Buyer Beware: Flooded Vehicles Are Coming

Hurricanes Irene and Lee flooded thousands of cars across the Northeast, totaling them. Such heavily damaged vehicles get "salvage" titles to warn potential buyers, but thanks to greedy scammers and lax interstate oversight, many of those total-loss vehicles are about to resurface on America's used car lots -- with clean titles.

9/11 Survivor Finds 'Purpose' by Helping Others

In 2001, Nicole B. Simpson was just another Morgan Stanley financial planner on the 73rd floor when the 9/11 attacks struck. She survived, but the emotional trauma left her old life in the wreckage. Eventually, though, she found a new purpose in helping others through traumas of their own.

Workers' Rights 100 Years After the Triangle Fire

A century after the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire claimed the lives of 146 seamstresses in New York, worker protections are eroding around the world. As government and corporate interests from Bangladesh to Wisconsin wage war on the rights of labor, have the lessons of the Triangle disaster been forgotten?

The Sorry State of America's Wage Earners

Everyone knows that the typical American household has been running in place or falling behind financially, thanks to stagnant wages and rising prices. But a new study from the the Economic Policy Institute shows that the problem has been endemic not for years, but for decades.

Before Wisconsin: Five of American Labor's Biggest Battles

Can you say image problem? For the first time in the more than 70 years that Gallup has been measuring the popularity of unions, in 2009 more than half the public didn't approve of them. The current showdown in Wisconsin has plenty of precedent when it comes to transformative moments for organized labor.

Government Workers Aren't Living Large

Though the media often reports on eye-popping salaries of government officials, such as school superintendents and other political appointees, most public-sector workers don't do nearly as well. Typically, they earn about 6% less than workers in the private sector.

N.J. Appeals Court Blocks Foreclosure Over Bad Docs

A New Jersey court has invalidated a foreclosure by insisting on a basic concept of due process -- that the bank must authenticate the documents it uses to make its case. But in the case of Wells Fargo v. Sandra A. Ford, there are more issues than just who owns the mortgage. She has fraud claims that go back to the very beginning.

Big Banks to New Jersey: Stop Bugging Us About Foreclosures

When New Jersey tightened its foreclosure rules in response to the false document crisis, it ordered the six largest servicers to explain why they should be allowed to continue foreclosing on homes. Their response: 'Trust us, everything's fine now.' If you think there's irony in that assertion, read on ...

N.J. Digs Out from Blizzard Without Gov. or Lt. Gov.

New Jersey residents voted in 2005 to give their state a lieutenant governor, so even though Gov. Chris Christie is on vacation in Florida while his state is getting pounded by a blizzard, the should be no leadership vacuum in Trenton. But his backup, Lt. Gov. Kim Guadagno, picked this week to go away on vacation too.

How the Housing Mess Hit My Neighborhood

Millions of houses are in foreclosure in the U.S. Even if your house is safe, your neighbors may be in trouble, and your neighborhood could suffer as a result. Here's the story of one house in a neighborhood in New Jersey.

12 Big Comebacks of 2010

Everything old is new again, or so the song says. And each year we do see forgotten faces, places and products emerge from the dim past to recapture...

For New Jersey's Chris Christie, It Was Simply a Tunnel Into Debt

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie today canceled the multibillion dollar rail tunnel under the Hudson River, the nation's largest public works project, for the second time in less than a month. For Christie, it all came down to money. And that helps burnish his fiscal conservative cred.

The High Price of New Jersey's Cheap Gasoline Tax

At 10.5 cents per gallon, Jersey has the third-lowest gas tax in America. No governor has dared push to raise it, and Chris Christie isn't about to change that. Problem is: The state's trust fund that uses gas taxes is running dry -- at the worst time.

New Jersey Settles SEC Fraud Claims

The state of New Jersey settled claims that it misled investors in $26 billion of municipal bonds. The state agreed to settle the SEC case without admitting or denying the agency%u2019s findings, Bloomberg News reported.