netflix

5 Key Things to Watch In the Stock Market This Week

Among the events that will move the stock market this week -- big changes for a smartphone pioneer in trouble, and a big debut for a video streaming service trying to keep its momentum. Here's your quick guide to the days ahead on Wall Street.

Netflix: No, We Won't Stream New Releases

Netflix is the undisputed champ when it comes to streaming video. But there's one thing its competitors will do that Netflix won't: stream new releases. Will that be the company's undoing?

Disney Strikes Out in the Online Video Streaming Business

Disney is shutting down Disney Movies Online. Visitors to the site are being told that the hub is closing at the end of the year. Disney Movies Online wasn't a bad idea, but it turns out, not even the House of Mouse is big enough to support a streaming venture that streams only its own videos.

Wall Street Watch: Icahn Streams Into Netflix, Buys a 10% Stake

Carl Icahn is making a move on Netflix. The infamous activist investor and corporate raider has taken a nearly 10% stake in the DVD rental and video streaming giant, which means he must see a way to make a profit on its recent troubles. So does Icahn have a buyer in mind?

Netflix Earnings: Expect Those Disks to Keep on Skipping

Netflix shares were hammered on Wednesday after it posted weak domestic subscriber growth and dialed back its forecast. Many will argue that there's nothing wrong with where it is now, but there are real problems and real volatility driving the plot at the leading premium video service.

Why Netflix Will Never Be Great Again

There were a few positives in Netflix's quarterly report Tuesday, but the stock fell 14% thanks in part to mixed results and uninspiring guidance. But the real reasons investors fled are more complex -- and disturbing.

What to Watch This Week: Funds, 'Flix, Photocopies and Freshmen

This week on Wall Street, everyone will be watching Netflix; mutual funds will talk assets under management; we'll see earnings from some stock freshmen; NFL teams will pick their own fresh stock; and a few companies are likely to issue deja vu quarterly reports.

Tech Scoop: My First 24 Hours With the New Apple TV

Today is a big day for Apple fans. The new Apple TV and the new iPad are both being released. My Apple TV was delivered a day early, so I've got the scoop: Here's what to expect when you open the box and plug in.

No Video Streaming Service Will Ever Fit All

It's getting pretty crowded in the streaming space. Comcast is the latest company to throw its hat into the digital ring: It will offer existing cable subscribers access to streaming TV shows and movies through a new service called Streampix. And other streaming services, from Netflix to YouTube, are offering original content.

DVDs Are Dying: Can Anything Rescue Hollywood?

DVDs -- and even their more modern Blu-ray siblings -- are gradually fading to black, as VHS and LaserDisc did before them. Movie studios have seen this coming for some time. Problem is, it's part of a bigger trend they may not be able to overcome.

Verizon-Redbox Deal Adds to Online Video Choices

Verizon and Coinstar are joining forces in a new Internet streaming video venture built around Redbox's DVD-rental kiosks. Details are sketchy so far, but it will bundle streaming and DVDs, and it'll probably cost less than dominant player Netflix's service.

Netflix Tells Amazon: 'Been There, Done That'

An online giant sees its margins contract as it replaces physical delivery with digital delivery. Revenue's growing. Profitability's shrinking. It may even post an operating loss during the next quarter. Not many months ago, this was Netflix. Now, it's Amazon.com.

Will Apple's iTV Be the Kiss of Death for Netflix?

Apple and Netflix have gotten chummy lately, but that may be about to change. When Apple brings out its soon-to-appear next-gen HDTV, there's no question it'll have all sorts of clever high-tech goodies. What is a question is how it will serve up video content.

Rabbit Ears Redux: Free Antenna TV Makes a Comeback

Millions of TV lovers hit by the weak economy and fat cable bills are going old-school: They're using antennas. That's right: The rabbit ears your grandmother jiggled to tune in "I Love Lucy" can still receive dozens of digital channels on HDTVs. Here's how you can rule the free airwaves.

Can Netflix CEO Reed Hastings Bounce Back?

If Netflix's poorly received rate hike and Qwikster fiasco didn't leave you questioning CEO Reed Hastings' ability to lead the video buffet operator, Monday night's quarterly report should do the trick. But it'll take more than strategic missteps and fumbled apologies to send the CEO packing.

3 Messes That Netflix Needs to Clean Up

The Qwikster jokes are already old, and it's back to business as usual for video buffet operator Netflix -- or is it? Its stock prices are low, and there are lingering questions. But Netflix can make it right with the public again, starting with cleaning up these three big messes it recently made.

What Was Wall St. Thinking (Last Week Ed.)?

The boneheaded move of the week was committed by financial journalists, who collectively decided to blame Netflix's recent price hike for its reduction in subscriber targets -- a bad call indeed. Other head-scratchers included the end of boastful Fidelity Magellan chief Harry Lange's tenure, Cracker Barrel's attempts to evade Biglari Holdings, and Restoration Hardware's IPO.

Netflix CEO Apologizes, Divides Company

In an open apology to Netflix customers, CEO Reed Hastings took the blame for the price hikes and service changes that generated such negative reactions. He also announced that Netflix was splitting its DVD-by-mail business off under a new name: Qwikster.

Starz Falls Out With Netflix: Who Will Take Advantage?

The Netflix Goliath was seriously weakened this week when Starz said it will pull its content from the company's streaming feed in February: Is it time for the industry Davids such as Redbox, Blockbuster and Amazon to pull out their slingshots?

How Companies Fake It (With Cash Flow)

Focusing on cash flow -- instead of the figures Wall Street is so fond of -- is a good way to measure a company's strength. That said, just like revenue and earnings, cash flow can be manipulated in order to hoodwink investors. Look out for these four signs that a company's pulling a fast one with cash flow.

5 Things That Went Wrong at Netflix

It's been a rough day for Netflix (NFLX). Shares of the movie provider opened nearly 10% lower today after it disappointed investors with last...

7 Free Shipping Options for E-Retailers

Online retailing is big business, and growing. As virtual storefronts become major revenue generators, many retailers are realizing the value of free shipping, which has the potential to greatly increase sales. Consider these seven promotional strategies, good for consumers and investors.

Last Week's Biggest Market Head-Scratchers

Wall Street can be fickle, leaving investors scratching their heads in bewilderment. Some of last week's biggest surprises, blunders, and flat-out boneheaded moves included Netflix's misguided pricing hike, ill-timed IPO announcements by Norwegian Cruise Lines and Zillow, and Trex going the way of Lumber Liquidators.

Does Netflix Fury Show How Addicted We Are to Subscriptions?

Netflix's massive rate hike plan represents a 60% increase for some of its customers -- a giant step up by any standard. And the unspoken cost is, of course, the price of broadband Internet service customers also pay, likely on top of a cable bill, cellphone bill and other media subscriptions. In the end, how much media - and how many subscriptions - do we really need? Even as the offerings around us increase, there are still only 24 hours in a day.

Is Netflix Still Worth It?

Six dollars. This is what had the internet boiling yesterday. Six dollars a month, or just less than 20 cents a day. As someone in my Twitter stream...

What You Need to Know About Netflix's Price Hike

Netflix sent shockwaves through the living room yesterday after revealing that it will separate its mail-served discs and streaming service into two distinct pricing plants. And while the initial reaction by many subscribers has been outrage, there's really no need to panic. Here are some myths and misconceptions creating undue concern about Netflix's new deal.