netflix

What Was Wall St. Thinking (Last Week Ed.)?

The boneheaded move of the week was committed by financial journalists, who collectively decided to blame Netflix's recent price hike for its reduction in subscriber targets -- a bad call indeed. Other head-scratchers included the end of boastful Fidelity Magellan chief Harry Lange's tenure, Cracker Barrel's attempts to evade Biglari Holdings, and Restoration Hardware's IPO.

Netflix CEO Apologizes, Divides Company

In an open apology to Netflix customers, CEO Reed Hastings took the blame for the price hikes and service changes that generated such negative reactions. He also announced that Netflix was splitting its DVD-by-mail business off under a new name: Qwikster.

Starz Falls Out With Netflix: Who Will Take Advantage?

The Netflix Goliath was seriously weakened this week when Starz said it will pull its content from the company's streaming feed in February: Is it time for the industry Davids such as Redbox, Blockbuster and Amazon to pull out their slingshots?

How Companies Fake It (With Cash Flow)

Focusing on cash flow -- instead of the figures Wall Street is so fond of -- is a good way to measure a company's strength. That said, just like revenue and earnings, cash flow can be manipulated in order to hoodwink investors. Look out for these four signs that a company's pulling a fast one with cash flow.

7 Free Shipping Options for E-Retailers

Online retailing is big business, and growing. As virtual storefronts become major revenue generators, many retailers are realizing the value of free shipping, which has the potential to greatly increase sales. Consider these seven promotional strategies, good for consumers and investors.

Last Week's Biggest Market Head-Scratchers

Wall Street can be fickle, leaving investors scratching their heads in bewilderment. Some of last week's biggest surprises, blunders, and flat-out boneheaded moves included Netflix's misguided pricing hike, ill-timed IPO announcements by Norwegian Cruise Lines and Zillow, and Trex going the way of Lumber Liquidators.

Does Netflix Fury Show How Addicted We Are to Subscriptions?

Netflix's massive rate hike plan represents a 60% increase for some of its customers -- a giant step up by any standard. And the unspoken cost is, of course, the price of broadband Internet service customers also pay, likely on top of a cable bill, cellphone bill and other media subscriptions. In the end, how much media - and how many subscriptions - do we really need? Even as the offerings around us increase, there are still only 24 hours in a day.

What You Need to Know About Netflix's Price Hike

Netflix sent shockwaves through the living room yesterday after revealing that it will separate its mail-served discs and streaming service into two distinct pricing plants. And while the initial reaction by many subscribers has been outrage, there's really no need to panic. Here are some myths and misconceptions creating undue concern about Netflix's new deal.

Netflix Customers Pissed Off by New Rate Hike

Movie rental giant Netflix's decision to raise rates by up to 60% has caused a big stir among some of its 23 million subscribers. Could the higher prices lead to cancellations, slow the company's growth? Are you a subscriber? Share your thoughts about the rate hike on our message board.

Should Netflix Be Afraid of YouTube's Movie Rentals?

Google's video-sharing site, YouTube, is giving Netflix investors a little scare with its recent announcement that it has doubled the number of movie titles in its rental library to 6,000. But could YouTube's strategy be successful enough that it could directly compete with Netflix?

Should Netflix Stream Its Video Business Into the U.K.?

Netflix is enjoying a period of rapid expansion, riding on the popularity of DVD-by-mail and online video streaming. The question for investors is: What's next? Netflix has signaled that it plans to expand abroad, and the U.K. is a likely target. But is Britain ready for Netflix?

Facebook: Writing a Script for Online Movie Consolidation?

Warner Brothers is launching the first streaming-video app that lets people rent movies through Facebook. First up: The Dark Knight. It's a small test, but when Facebook enters a business, competitors get nervous: Here's how this move could trigger a round of mergers among the established players.

Blockbuster Should Liquidate Instead of Reorganize

Blockbuster should liquidate instead of reorganize under new ownership because the video-rental store chain lacks the necessary cash to continue operations after a proposed sale is completed, Home Media Magazine reported, citing a division of the U.S. Justice Department.

Disney Raises DVD Prices for Rental Giants Netflix, Redbox

Walt Disney is increasing the wholesale prices it charges for DVDs to movies-by-mail leader Netflix and movie-rental kiosk operator Redbox. Disney is looking to benefit further from being the only major studio to sell DVDs to the companies for rental the day they go on sale to the public.

In This Corner, Netflix. In the Other Corner. . .Amazon?

Netflix, whose DVD-by-mail service hastened the demise of several video rental chains, may soon find itself under siege from Amazon. The world's largest online retailer appears to be on the verge of launching its own unlimited movie and TV-show streaming service.