mining

BHP Billiton Warns It Won't Buy Potash Corp 'At Any Cost'

BHP Billiton (BHP), the world%u2019s largest mining company, warned that it is not willing to buy Potash Corp (POT) "at any cost." CEO Marius Kloppers made the warning after announcing bumper profits for the first half of the year, Reuters reported.

Potash Had Contact With Brazil's Vale, China's Sinochem

Potash Corp. (POT) had contact with China%u2019s Sinochem Group and Brazil%u2019s Vale (VALE) as the Canadian company looks for alternatives to a hostile takeover bid from BHP Billiton Ltd (BHP). Vale and Sinochem both made contact late last week, Bloomberg News reported without naming its sources. Neither company has held formal talks with the world%u2019s biggest fertilizer company.

When is $39 billion is not enough?

Potash shareholders says $39 billion is not enough for the world's largest fertilizer firm, who continues to look for a buyer willing to top BHP...

Kinross Gold to Buy Red Back Mining for $7.1 Billion

Kinross Gold Corp. (KGC) will buy the 91% of shares in Red Back Mining (RBIFF) that it doesn%u2019t already own. Kinross will pay $7.1 billion for the shares. The price represents a value of C$30.50 ($29.77) per Red Back share, The International Business Times reported. That%u2019s a premium of 17% over the price of Red Back shares at close of trading on the Toronto Stock Exchange on Friday.

Face-Off: Tim Hortons, Rio Tinto and McAfee

With market volatility comes opportunity. Problem is, one man's gold can be another man's garbage. Here, Nikhil Hutheesing and Dan Burrows give their "thumbs-up, thumbs-down" views on three hot stocks: Tim Hortons (THI), Rio Tinto (RTP) and McAfee (MFE).

What It Will Take to Tap Afghanistan's Potential Mineral Riches

Newly-located mineral deposits in Afghanistan could mean new wealth for an impoverished nation that has been crippled by decades of war. But getting those riches out of the ground will require years of development and billions of dollars in investment.

China to Benefit from Afghan Mineral Riches

The conflict in Afghanistan has cost the U.S. more than $940 billion, but recently, Americans have discovered that nation is sitting on upwards of $1 trillion in untapped mineral deposits. But the resources we've found are are likely to end up getting mined by Russian and Chinese firms.

In Coal Mining, Economics Still Trumps Safety

This week's disaster at a West Virginia coal mine reminds us that our dependency on coal for energy isn't going away. Until this week, many analysts had hoped the coal mining industry, while still dangerous, had become safer. U.S. mining injuries and fatalities have been declining since 2001.