medicine

Johnson & Johnson Recalls More Children's Medicines

Just days after Johnson & Johnson's Children's Tylenol started returning to store shelves, the health care giant has recalled about four million packages of Children's Benadryl allergy tablets and some 800,000 bottles of Junior Strength Motrin, citing manufacturing problems.

World Drug Sales to Hit $880 Billion in 2011

Global pharmaceutical sales are expected to grow by 5% to 7% in 2011 to around $880 billion, thanks to robust growth in emerging markets, especially China, as well as new innovative treatments, and despite patent expirations and budget pressures in the developed world.

Judge Approves $600 Million Botox Settlement

A federal investigation into Allergan's misleading marketing of its wrinkle-smoothing Botox medication is over after a judge in Georgia on Tuesday approved the pharmaceutical firm's decision to pay $600 million and plead guilty to misbranding the product.

J&J Apologizes for Kids Medicine Issues, Phantom Recalls

In testimony before Congress Thursday, Johnson & Johnson's CEO apologized for the problems that have beset his company, including the quality issues with its children's medicines and the "phantom recall" of a batch of Motrin. He also said new batches of its children's medicines should start shipping next week.

McNeil Expands Recall of Tylenol, Motrin, Benadryl

Johnson & Johnson subsidiary McNeil recalled another batch of over-the-counter medicines Thursday. The specific lots of Tylenol, Motrin and Benadryl products may have been contaminated with trace amounts of a chemical that gives them a musty or moldy odor.

No New Children's Tylenol on Shelves This Year

Johnson & Johnson said Thursday that the Fort Washington, Pa., facility where it produced children's medications will probably stay shut down for the rest of 2010, meaning that no new supplies of those medicines will be available this year.

NIH Report on Alzheimer's: There's Nothing You Can Do

The National Institutes of Health delivered a disturbingly negative message this week: None of the methods used to prevent, delay or reduce the severity of Alzheimer's disease have been shown to work. Quite simply, mental stimulation, exercise, diets and dietary supplements accomplish nothing.

Stem Cell Therapies: Is Now the Time to Invest?

For investors on the hunt for groundbreaking technologies, stem cell therapies originally looked promising. But while the world waited for research to transform into treatments, Wall Street largely lost interest. Now, the science is accelerating, but stock prices haven't caught up. Is today your chance to make a killing on healing?

Common Antibacterial Ingredient May Be a Health Hazard

The FDA said on Thursday it was conducting a safety review of triclosan, a widely used antibacterial chemical that can be found in products from soap to toys. While triclosan isn't known to be hazardous, the FDA said, recent studies merit further review of the ingredient.

Concierge Medicine: Paying for Your Doc's Undivided Attention

Long a must-have for stars and the very rich, concierge doctors are becoming more common among the middle class who are fed up with long waits and rushed visits in traditional practices. These patients are willing to pay a price for doctors who are available 24/7 and who make house calls.

The Doctor Is In: Health Reform Is
In Trouble

Why is public support falling? People are confused by all the rhetoric, shocked by the huge price tag and scared that the proposed changes will only make the situation worse. Yet it's not too late for Congress to come together and improve a system that isn't working now.