medicaid

Who Really Gets the Lion's Share of Entitlements?

Conservative politicians have spent the past few months venting their ire on America's entitlement programs, and the alleged mass of lazy layabouts who make use of them. But a closer look at who actually lands in the social safety net reveals some surprising facts.

US Poverty at New High: 16 Percent, or 49.1M

A record number of Americans %u2014 49.1 million %u2014 are poor, based on a new census measure that for the first time takes into account rising medical costs and other expenses. The numbers released Monday are part of a first-ever supplemental poverty measure aimed at providing a fuller picture of poverty.

Long-Term Care for Elderly, Disabled Has Far to Improve

For the first time, there's a state-by-state scorecard of America's performance in providing long-term services and support to senior citizens and people with disabilities, and the results aren't much to brag about. But they do point the way toward improving the long-term care system -- and saving the nation billions.

Cutting Medicare Eligibility Would Cost U.S. Billions

Among the many ideas legislators in Washington have proposed for reducing federal spending is raising the age at which Americans qualify for Medicare benefits from 65 to 67. On the surface, that makes sense. But scratch the surface and the numbers show it to be an $11 billion blunder.

Debt-Ceiling Law: States Brace for Another Hit

The debt-ceiling discussions may be over, but the fallout for states is just starting. Many states, still struggling to recover to pre-recession levels, have depended on federal money to make up their shortfalls. As the flow of money slows, which states will take the biggest hits?

Social Security: Why Seniors Are Just Plain Angry

If Congress fails to raise the debt ceiling soon, come August, the White House warns that tens of millions of Social Security recipients may find their mailboxes empty when they go looking for their checks. Even though some describe it as a "fear tactic," protests by seniors and their advocates are getting much louder.

Don't Let Nana Drive You Into Bankruptcy

For children, excursions with grandmother are an adventure. As time passes, however, the ride into the golden years can get bumpy; if you're financially unprepared, it can take a dramatic turn for the worse, and even drive you and your family into bankruptcy. Here are some steps you can take to prevent that.

How to Not End Up Uninsured When You're Unemployed

If you think there have to be better ways for an uninsured person to get health care than robbing a bank, you're right. Yes, most people get their health insurance from their employers, but if you're one of the nation's nearly 14 million unemployed, you still have options. Here's what you need to know.

Bank Robber Wants $1 and Health Care

Bank robberyIf you've ever watched a movie or TV show featuring a bank heist, you know the basic elements: There's the criminal planning for a big score that...

Digging Into the U.S. Budget: What We Spend, and How

Getting even a tentative handle on the multi-trillion dollar federal budget is no easy matter. Still, as the debate surrounding U.S. spending, taxes and the looming debt ceiling continues, it's worth asking: Exactly how does America spend all that cash, and what do the choices being debated really mean?

Will Budget Battle End With a Tax Increase?

Republicans pushing for spending cuts in the 2011 federal budget may be ready to shut the government down to get their way. But is anyone ready to do what it would take to really make a dent in the federal budget: raise taxes on the rich, close corporate tax loopholes, and cut war spending?

Six Ways to Avoid Common Retirement Planning Pitfalls

More than half of American workers have less than $25,000 saved for retirement, but having too little set aside is just one of many ways you can sabotage your later years. We examine some oft-made financial planning traps -- and the safe paths around them.

Fewer Americans Get Employer Health Insurance

Amid high unemployment rates and rising health-care costs, a smaller proportion of Americans -- less than 45% -- are getting health insurance from their employers, according to a recent Gallup survey.

More Proof That Whistleblowing on Medicaid Fraud Works

Whistleblowing firm Ven-A-Care has recovered $2 billion for taxpayers by suing drug companies that overcharge the government and create windfalls for participating pharmacies. It also has made $380 million for itself. What's the problem with that?

State of the Union: Obama Eager to Fix Health Reform Law

In his State of the Union address, President Obama didn't shy away from tackling the ongoing questions about the health care reform law head on. And though he opened with a joke, he made it clear that while he's serious about repairing any flaws in the law, repeal is not an option.

What a Wild Year It Was
for Health Care

Led by the health insurance reform law, a flurry of drug and food recalls, key medical breakthroughs and plenty of layoffs and lawsuits, 2010 proved to be an exciting -- if not always positive -- year. Here's our list of the year's biggest health stories.

Americans Are Most Likely to Go Without Health Care

An international survey of 11 industrialized nations reveals that adults in the U.S. are by far the most likely to go without health care or skip filling a prescription because of costs, due to a high-cost health care system that lags behind those of other modern countries.

Almost Half of All Americans Are on Drugs

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released data that found that almost half of all Americans took at least one prescription drug per month in 2008, up from 43.5% a decade ago.

One in Six Americans Is Now on Medicaid

One in Six Americans A record one in six Americans are on Medicaid, the government's health program for the poor, according to USA Today. And Medicaid is just one of several government anti-poverty programs that have seen large increases in caseloads and in costs.

Will Federal Health Care Costs Cripple Deficit-Cutting?

By some calculations, the Obama plan will help trim future budget gaps, but by others it'll only make things worse. The problem is, at this point no one knows for sure, and that makes sensible spending choices even harder to make now.

What's at Stake in the Census 2010 Count? Plenty

The U.S. Census Bureau is pushing residents to mail Census 2010 forms back ahead of the April 1 deadline. States could stand to lose an average of $1,400 for each person not counted and taxpayers could lose $1.5 billion in costs associated with tracking down those who fail to send in the forms by mail.