medicaid

Could Slowing Health Care Costs Save Medicare?

The rise in health care costs has significantly outpaced both inflation and economic growth for decades, leading to increasingly dire projections about Medicare's long-term solvency in recent years. Yet some promising trends suggest the government program may get a new lease on life.

What's Next for Obamacare Foes Now That Rick Scott Has Caved

On Wednesday, Florida Gov. Rick Scott, one of the most outspoken critics of President Obama's Affordable Care Act -- and the Medicaid expansion it carries with it -- announced that Florida will accept the federal windfall that the program will bring.

Obama Agenda Will Confront GOP On Debt

Deficit spending got just a single mention in President Obama's inaugural address. But the outcome of the the long-running conflict with Republicans over his tax-and-spend policies will help shape the government's role in coming years, not to mention Obama's legacy.

Debt Crisis Looms as Congress Digs in Its Heels

Legislators show no signs they're heading toward compromise in resolving the nation's next financial crisis, with Democrats talking about further taxes hikes on the rich, and Republicans saying a crippling default on U.S. debt is possible unless they get significant cuts in government spending.

Fiscal Cliff Averted: 6 Things You Can Stop Worrying About

After months of lead-up, America finally went over the fiscal cliff -- for about 34 hours, before a bipartisan compromise was reached. So, with an eye toward the bright side, here's are six things that you no longer need to worry about now that the fiscal cliff has been averted.

8 Retirement Money Questions for 2013

As 2012 draws to a close, people in or nearing retirement face a stunning set of uncertainties about their finances and even basic health and retirement benefits. Here are 8 pressing money and issues that are bearing down on seniors.

Fiscal Cliff Talks Appear to Be Stalled

Despite an intensifying pace, little progress is being reported in talks on averting automatic spending cuts and tax increases that economists fear could send the U.S. economy off a "fiscal cliff."

Senate Dems Split on Cutting Benefits to Get Fiscal Cliff Deal

Deep divisions among Senate Democrats over whether cuts to Medicare and Medicaid should be part of a plan to slow the growth of the federal debt pose a big obstacle to a deal for avoiding a potentially economy-crushing "fiscal cliff," even if Republicans agree to raise taxes.

5 Years From Retirement? 5 Things to Do Right Now

With just five years left before you retire, you need to begin solidifying your plans. Make sure you're still on track, but also nail down where you'll live and how you'll meet your health care needs. Here's how:

Presidential Debate Preview: What They'll Say About Obamacare

Wednesday's first presidential debate between Mitt Romney and Barack Obama is being hyped as an epic battle: More likely, it'll be a highly scripted rehash of well-worn talking points. But if real drama does occurs, one likely flashpoint will be health care reform.

The Biggest Mistake of Financial Planning for Special Needs Kids

When it comes to raising special needs children, the financial challenges can be overwhelming -- expensive in the near term, and making long-term planning even more of a high-stakes endeavor. And, with the best of intentions, parents could be making one incredibly costly mistake.

Pop Quiz: Who Gets the Benefit from Federal Entitlement Programs?

Over the past few years, the benefits that America offers its citizens have become the center of a huge debate. But who actually qualifies for benefits, and how are they designed to work? If you're interested in where entitlement spending goes, take a peek at our little quiz.

For Many Hopeful Retirees, 70 May Not Be the New 65 After All

It%u2019s become common (and comforting) wisdom: Those who haven%u2019t saved enough for their golden years can meet their retirement income needs by working until they're 70, instead of the traditional 65. But that's not true for at least a third of U.S. workers, reveals a new study.

Paul Ryan's Budget vs. President Obama's: How They Differ

Even before Mitt Romney picked him as his running mate, Paul Ryan was a Tea Party star, a fiscal-policy super-wonk and author of the GOP House's budget proposal. Here's a look at some of the ways Ryan's fiscal ideas contrast with President Obama's:

GOP VP Pick Paul Ryan's Medicare Plan Back in Spotlight

Republican Paul Ryan's blueprint for Medicare could prove one of the most polarizing policies of the election. While it's short on details, one thing is clear: It would shift thousands of dollars a year in health are costs back to individual retirees.

Red States Are the Big Winners from Obamacare's New Rules

To bring some parts of Obamacare online, Washington will have to work with the states, some which have governors intensely opposed to the program. But many of the states whose leaders like Obamacare the least are the ones that will benefit from it the most.

Obamacare Upheld: How It Will Affect Your Wallet and Your Life

On Thursday morning, when the Supreme Court ruled that Obamacare was constitutional, there was a brief pause as the country took a moment to imagine what this brave new world would look like. Well, Stop imagining, and let us draw you a picture...

How Uncle Sam Spends Your Taxes: The U.S. Budget in 8 Easy Bites

Almost everyone agrees the federal deficit is a ticking bomb, but when it comes to ideas for solving the problem, some are contradictory and all are controversial. No wonder: If you look at where the money actually goes, it's easy to see why it's so hard to balance the budget.

Who Really Gets the Lion's Share of Entitlements?

Conservative politicians have spent the past few months venting their ire on America's entitlement programs, and the alleged mass of lazy layabouts who make use of them. But a closer look at who actually lands in the social safety net reveals some surprising facts.