massachusetts

Are High Taxes Making Small Business Slow
to Hire?

The majority of jobs in the U.S. are created by small business, which are still reluctant to hire new workers. And while some of their reasons for holding back may mirror those of big businesses, local conditions like state taxes may loom larger in their decisions.

Why a New York Judge Is Throwing Out Foreclosure Cases

On Oct. 20, New York courts ordered attorneys for foreclosing banks to swear they'd personally confirmed that their documents are true and accurate. But a Brooklyn judge has taken things a step further. Since the banks aren't complying, he has started throwing out foreclosure cases.

Mass. State Colleges Upgrade by Changing Names

In a move that even elected officials admit is little more than a marketing ploy, the Massachusetts State House of Representatives approved a bill that will change the names of Bridgewater, Fitchburg, Framingham, Salem, Westfield and Worcester state colleges to universities.

Health Care After Reforms: More to Cheer than Fear

Some states are balking Obama's health-reform requirements for them to set up exchanges on which uninsured individuals and small businesses can purchase health coverage. But a closer look suggests uninsured Americans will be better off.

Salvaging Health Care After the Massachusetts Upset

The Senate race between Democrat Martha Coakley and Republican Scott Brown was widely seen as a referendum on health care reform. But while Brown's victory means the current plans for reform may not pass, it doesn't mean that the system is any less in need of major change.

Wal-Mart to Pay $40 Million to Settle Labor Suit

Wal-Mart agreed to pay $40 million to settle a lawsuit filed in Massachusetts that alleged the big-box retailer cheated 87,500 current and former employees in the state out of pay and failed to obey work rules. The class-action suit, filed in 2001, accused Wal-Mart of altering time cards, refusing to pay overtime, and denying workers rest and meal breaks.