libya protests

Good News on Gas Prices: A Sharp Drop Is Just Ahead

With security concerns in the Middle East receding and the commodities bubble deflating, oil prices are headed sharply lower. Gas prices should follow suit: The analysts say they will get 25 cents a gallon cheaper in the next few days, and drop even further as the summer rolls on.

The Bulls Are Optimistic Despite Global Turmoil

Despite turmoil around the world, U.S. markets have been rising again, but is this a temporary bump, or the return of a bull market? The sharp-eyed analysts of Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs say its the latter, and their money is on strong growth ahead.

Is the Market Rally Over, or Is It Just Taking a Breather?

Markets hate uncertainty more than bad news, which is one reason they've swooned: No one can predict the long-term economic effects of Japan's earthquake or Middle Eastern upheaval. But technical analysis looks at the patterns deeper than the daily news, and the charts suggest a real bear ahead.

Are Investors Ignoring All the Good News?

With all the tragedy dominating the news these days, it's easy to be pessimistic. But the cold, hard facts about the economy actually paint a more optimistic picture.

Ian Bremmer Talks Global Politics and Investing Pitfalls

Most Wall Street experts are far better equipped to analyze corporate risks rather than political ones. But today, it's political unrest in the Middle East and beyond that's driving world markets. So we asked Ian Bremmer, president of political risk consultancy The Eurasia Group, to break down the major developments and what investors should expect.

Five Oil Stocks To Offset Your Pain at the Pump

Given the prospect of $4-plus gasoline this summer, what's an American to do? Beyond switching to a higher-MPG vehicle, you can consider buying some oil stocks with plenty of upside potential to help offset your pain at the pump. Here are five candidates.

The Scariest Part of Soaring Oil Prices: Investors' Fears

Friday's market sell-off may have been more about paranoia than about real risk. Some JPMorgan calculations indicate that the potential impact of rising oil prices on the economy may be less than most investors think. But the fear factor itself also can't be overlooked.

The Fix for High Oil Prices? Regulate the Speculators

As the crisis in Libya continues to shake world oil markets, many voices are calling for President Obama to tap into the Strategic Petroleum Reserve. With gasoline prices up 33 cents a gallon in the last month, that's a tempting idea. It's also the wrong one.

Labor's Fall -- Not Oil's Rise -- Is Key to Inflation

Despite all the worry over the impact of rising oil prices, recall that the U.S. is now a largely services-based economy, and observe that the rising wages that have led to real overall cost rises in decades past are nowhere to be found today. Exhibit A is in Wisconsin.

Leaping Gas Prices Have Drivers Hitting the Brakes

As national gasoline prices shoot higher each day, signs of motorists rationing gas purchases have begun springing up around the country. People are buying fewer gallons per fill up and paying more in cash than with credit. All signs that motorists are already cutting back.

Libya Isn't the Only Force Working Against Stocks

With Mideast turmoil chasing oil higher and stocks lower, it's a good time to check the charts and see what price levels seem to be key "lines in the sand." Some indicators have been warning for months that the steep rally was preparing to reverse.

Higher Pump Prices? Yes.
But Not $5 a Gallon

Americans could see gasoline spiking 10% to 18% higher in coming weeks as a result of the unrest in the Middle East, but they're unlikely go above $4 a gallon -- unless the uprisings spread to Saudi Arabia. In that case, all bets are off.

Leaping Oil Prices May Call for Emergency Measures

Worried about the sharp shock political unrest is giving to crude oil prices, international officials said oil-consuming nations have emergency reserves they can use to stabilize markets in case the violence in Libya and the wider Middle East escalates and crimps production.

Mideast Protests Could Send Investors Scurrying

In the long run, the changes being demanded in the Mideast may prove to be a cornerstone of further global economic growth and political stability. More immediately, though, the uprisings are likely to create the exactly the type of uncertainty that investors dread.