layoffs and downsizing

Major Banks Cutting 160,000 Jobs Worldwide -- With More to Come

Major banks have announced some 160,000 job cuts worldwide since early last year, more layoffs are coming as the industry restructures. The numbers are much higher in Europe than in Asia or the United States -- and those loses will be a particularly heavy blow to Britain.

Layoffs Leave Everyone Worse Off

Corporate executives stick to a script when pulling the layoff lever: Cite the tough economic landscape, promise that employees will remain the firm's most valued asset, insist that there was no other option to protect the company's future. Here's why you shouldn't buy what corporate America's selling when it comes to life-ruining layoffs.

Which Comes First: Jobs or Profits?

Lots of companies are laying off workers, trying to cut costs and improve their profit margins. But how should investors view the news of job cuts at a company? As a sign of deep trouble and worse to come, or as proof of committed management and better times ahead? Here's how to read the pink slips.

Why Are Rich Companies Laying Off Poor Workers?

Several major corporations have been announcing layoffs in recent weeks, despite their fattening coffers. What accounts for all the pink slips? Consumers don't like them, nor do investors -- at least, not the farsighted ones. Here are the real reasons behind these puzzling, and troubling, terminations.

Bank of America Reportedly Planning Layoffs

Bank of America (BAC) is laying off as many as 400 people as revenue from trading and advising clients falls. Bank of America, the country%u2019s largest bank by assets, is laying off people ranging from junior analysts to managing directors, Bloomberg News said without naming its sources.

CEOs Who Laid Off More Got Paid 42% More Money

CEOs who cut the most jobs during the recession earned an average of 42% more than their S&P 500 peers, according to a study by the Institute for Policy Studies. Top execs at the 50 firms that laid off the most workers since the economic crisis began averaged nearly $12 million in 2009.