labor department jobless rates

Unemployment Report Signals a Mild Slowdown in Hiring

The number of people seeking unemployment benefits suggests hiring is slowing. The Labor Department said Thursday that applications for initial jobless benefits dipped last week by 2,000, but that was only after it revised the previous week's number upward by 8,000.

Unemployment Rate Hits 8.3% After Hiring Burst

Employers went on a hiring spree in January and drove down the unemployment rate for a fifth straight month to 8.3 percent, its lowest point in nearly three years. The result pointed to a resurgent job market, and it sent stock futures surging. The Dow Jones industrial average futures, which were flat before the report, jumped 95 points.

Stocks Weaken Despite Strong December Jobs Report

Stocks are opening slightly lower despite a government report that the unemployment rate dropped in December to the lowest level in nearly three years. The Labor Department said early Friday that the unemployment rate fell last month to 8.5%, while U.S. employers added a net 200,000 jobs.

New Jobless Claims Drop, Approach Key Level

There was excellent news on the labor front this week as the government reported that initial jobless claims plunged 34,000 to 407,000. Jobless claims are now nearing a key threshold that would suggest commercial activity is increasing at a pace that would prompt more companies to resume hiring.

Initial Jobless Claims Higher Than Expected

In another setback on the employment front, initial jobless claims jumped a larger than anticipated 20,000 to 457,000, the Labor Department announced Thursday. Economists surveyed by Bloomberg had predicted initial jobless claims would total 443,000.

Initial Jobless Claims Unexpectedly Rise 13,000 to 462,000

Just call this week%u2019s labor report a wash: Initial jobless claims unexpectedly jumped 13,000 to 462,000, but continuing claims plunged another 112,000, and the trend in state-level claims continues to provide evidence that the period of layoffs is subsiding.

More Jobs Added Than Expected in August

The U.S. economy lost only 54,000 jobs in August -- less than had been expected -- while the private sector added a greater than predicted 67,000 jobs. Meanwhile, job loss totals for June and July were revised substantially downward.

Initial Jobless Claims Make a Surprise Jump

Initial jobless claims unexpectedly surged by 19,000 to 479,000, the Labor Department said Thursday, but the statistic was likely skewed higher by the normal, seasonal industrial shutdowns that happen every year in late summer.