jobless recovery

Jobless Claims Unchanged Last Week

The number of Americans filing new claims for jobless benefits was unchanged last week, pointing to a labor market that was treading water.

Welcome to the New Normal, Generation Y: Get Used to It

Hello, Gen Y! I've got good news and bad news for you. The good news is we've dodged a double dip recession. The bad news is that you're going to be seeing high unemployment for a long time to come. Here's some advice ...

Unemployment Hurting Oldest, Youngest Workers

Many of you reached out to Daily Finance earlier this week, after we ran a report on long-term unemployment's impact on older workers. Readers shared stories of careers terminated, benefits exhausted, and savings consumed. Today's news about slight improvements in the unemployment rate bring little relief.

Americans Got Poorer in 2010, Says Census Bureau

The Great Recession officially ended in mid-2009, but a recent Census Bureau report shows that, for the average American family, 2010 only brought increased misery: Household incomes plummeted last year, while the number of people living in poverty rose sharply to an all-time high.

How Our Economy Has Changed Since 9/11

Many of the economic problems of Sept. 11, 2001, feel awfully familiar today: Recession, bursting bubbles, low consumer confidence, predatory lending. But of course, it's a whole new world now, so we asked economists what the most significant shifts of the past decade have been. Their responses were enlightening.

To Understand the Weak Hiring Stats, Look in the Mirror

The vast majority of American businesses are privately held, run by ordinary people with all the same worries the rest of us have. And if you're cutting back on personal spending at home, how likely are you to feel comfortable hiring at work?

10 Hard Facts About America's Economic Recovery

As President Obama took part in his first-ever Twitter-facilitated town hall, jobs and the economy were high on the agenda. In line with those themes, the nonpartisan Economic Policy Institute held a little get-together of its own to outline 10 key facts about the recovery and what's really wrong with the economy.

Job Concerns Soar Among Employed, Unemployed

Employee concerns about layoffs have moved sharply higher according to a new survey by online jobs company Glassdoor. The percentage of those who are worried rose sharply to 22% in the second quarter, the highest that statistic has been since the third quarter of 2009, in the heart of the recession.

Vacations at Risk for 45% of Americans

A growing inclination among Americans to change their vacation plans shows that the slowing economy is taking a toll on consumer confidence. A new survey found that 45% of workers who have taken or plan to take a vacation this summer "would reduce or cancel their plans to save money if the economy continues its volatility."

Made in America Leaders That Make a Real Difference

How many problems with the U.S. economy would be solved if more people bought American, and if more companies would were willing to help them do so by manufacturing here? Joel Joseph of the Made in the USA Foundation thinks it would help plenty, and he's honoring companies that have taken the lead.

Could the S&P 500 Fall Another 20% in 2011?

After the losses of the past week, it seems hard to imagine that the S&P 500 has much further to decline. But the index took a fall to near 1,000 as recently as last July, and the issues that punished the markets then are looming over the economy again -- or perhaps, still.

Another Rough Summer Ahead for Teen Jobs

Teens hoping for employment this summer aren't likely to find the job market much better than last year, when teenage job seekers experienced the weakest seasonal market in decades.

More Employers More Are Likely to Hire in Second Quarter

The nation's employers are slowly becoming more positive about the economy, with a greater number of businesses planning to add jobs in the second quarter and fewer planning layoffs, according to a new survey released Tuesday by Manpower.

Career Risk-Taking Hits a New Low, Thanks to the Still-Weak Economy

Whether it was a fresh startup or a fresh start, fewer Americans seemed willing to take career risks last year, according to a new report by Challenger, Gray & Christmas. The percentage of job-seekers starting their own businesses or relocating for new positions fell to historic lows in 2010.

Ford Posts 13% Sales Gain in January

Ford Motor said sales of its cars and trucks rose 13.3% in January on improved demand by consumers, bucking last year's trend, when sales to fleet customers largely drove the increase. For the month, the automaker sold 127,317 units, up 13.3% compared to a year ago.

People@Work: Construction Job Growth Is Slowly Rebuilding

New forecasts show that the worst may be over for the construction industry, which was hit harder by the Great Recession than any other sector, as construction projects slowly resume. Some 27% of construction firms say they plan to add staff this year, while only 20% plan to cut jobs.

Why Jobs are Essential to the Economy

Americans who are unemployed or underemployed are three times as likely to fall behind on their bills as those who are fully employed, according to a Gallup Poll released Tuesday.

Tech Sector Job Cuts Fell to Lowest Level Since 2000

Job cuts in technology fields came to just under 47,000 last year, the lowest total for the sector since 2000, according to employment-services firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas. Better still, during the next 10 years, the sector is forecast to experience one of the fastest paces of job creation of any industry.

Social Insecurity: Inside the 'Trust Fund' Illusion

The federal government has been borrowing Social Security's surpluses for decades and issuing the program IOUs in return. However, the ability to pay those IOUs depends on the Treasury borrowing more money on global bond market at affordable rates. That's hardly a sure thing.

How Long Is America's Road Back to Full Employment?

There's no way to sugarcoat it: The U.S. job deficit is huge, and it will take years before we return to anyone's idea of full employment. But investors shouldn't become pessimistic: Our flexible economy%u2019s has the capacity to adapt and renew itself faster than many experts expect.

Job Growth Is Likely Next Year -- but How Much?

The good news is that economists generally expect employers to steadily add more workers in 2011, perhaps as many as 250,000 a month by year-end. However, with so many long-term unemployed returning to the market, the jobless rate could still outpace those new positions.

What the Rising Stock Market Doesn't Say About Jobs

If the stock market reflected the entire economy, happy days would surely be here again. But, alas, it reflects just the profit potential of public companies. And for millions of unemployed Americans, that's proving to be no help at all.

Economists: Jobs Are Coming.
The Unemployed: When?

An increasing number of observers, citing a preponderance of positive data, are optimistic that the stagnant labor market is finally beginning to gain momentum. But the pace is still way too slow for those desperately seeking work.