japan

How Steve Jobs Got the iPhone Into Japan

To break into the Japanese market, Steve Jobs took a chance on a self-made billionaire who had a crude drawing of an iPod phone and no mobile carrier to speak of.

Countries Spending the Most on the Military

The U.S. has a military budget four times larger than China even with a recent decline of more than $40 billion. Find out which countries spend the most on their military.

Why Smart Investors Should Support Immigration Reform

For the first time in a generation, there seems to be political will on both sides of the aisle to pass new immigration legislation. It's an issue generally framed as a political or cultural one, but it has profound consequences for investors, businesses and the whole U.S. economy.

Japan Solves Minor Boeing 787 Problems, But Not the Big One

Japanese authorities have identified the causes of fuel leaks and other problems with Boeing's 787 Dreamliners, but are still investigating the more serious battery problem that forced an emergency landing in January and the worldwide grounding of the jets.

More Nightmares for Dreamliner: Incident Grounds All 787s in Japan

Japan's two biggest airlines grounded all their Boeing 787s for safety checks Wednesday after one was forced to make an emergency landing. All Nippon Airways said a cockpit message showed battery problems and a burning smell was detected in the cockpit and the cabin.

Market Minute: FAA to Launch Comprehensive Review of Boeing 787

The Federal Aviation Administration is undertaking a comprehensive review of the critical systems of Boeing's 787s, the aircraft maker's newest and most technologically advanced plane, after a fire and a fuel leak earlier this week, the agency said Friday.

U.S. Stock Prices Dip Ahead of Earnings Season Kickoff

U.S. stocks fell Tuesday as traders awaited the start of the corporate earnings season. Market-watchers expect the quarter's results could include many surprises because of events like Superstorm Sandy, the presidential election, and the narrowly avoided "fiscal cliff."

Top 10 Business Stories of 2012

This would be the year when the global economy finally regained its vigor. At least that's what many had hoped. It didn't happen. So what were the top ten business stories of 2012?

Wall Street Back in Business After Hurricane Sandy Shutdown

The New York Stock Exchange opened on Wednesday -- because it had to open. In a bit of welcome news for fund managers, investors and even the economy, the company that operates the iconic exchange at 11 Wall Street announced it would not extend its trading shutdown to a third day.

3 Big Questions for Citi Now That It's Sent Pandit Packing

The sudden resignations of Citigroup CEO Vikram Pandit and COO John Havens, a day after the bank reported a purportedly good quarter, raise questions about the future strategy for Citigroup. So what might change under new CEO Michael Corbat?

Oil Prices Slide Due to Global Gloom Over Economic Outlook

The price of oil slipped below $92 a barrel on Monday as closely watched surveys showed the global economy remains weak. By early afternoon in Europe, benchmark oil for November delivery was down 47 cents to $91.72 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

Uniqlo Jump Starts U.S. Mall Expansion with Huge N.J. Store

Uniqlo kicked off its new attempt at expansion into U.S. malls on Friday, bringing its Apple-esque take on fashion to Westfield Garden State Plaza in Paramus, N.J., where it opened a 43,000-square-foot store. Will the second time be the charm for Japan's largest retailer?

Look Who's Buying America Now!

While Americans are still reeling from the housing bust, people from around the globe are scooping up cheap American homes. Over the 12 months that ended in March, nearly 9% of all real estate spending in the U.S. was done by buyers from abroad. Is it "Rising Sun" all over again?

Recession in Spain Breeds Pessimism in Global Markets

Markets dipped Monday after official data confirmed that Spain is back in its second recession in three years. Investors had initially bid up stocks on hopes that the Fed would provide more stimulus to the U.S. economy.

Is Corporate America Too Focused on Profit Margins?

I recently penned a column pointing out that when America "lost" the TV manufacturing industry to Japan, it wasn't necessarily a bad thing, because the business has become a low-margin money loser. A lot of readers disagreed.

3 Economic Misconceptions That Need to Die

One of this country's biggest economic problems is a tsunami of misinformation. You can't have a rational debate when facts are so easily supplanted by overreaching statements and errors. Here are three misconceptions about our economy that need to be laid to rest.

Why to Be Glad America Isn't Making TVs Anymore

It's hard to complain too much about how Japan "stole" the high-tech electronics business from the U.S. More accurately, they took a low-margin business off our hands. And you know what we should be saying to that? Good riddance!