identitytheft

Your Smartphone's Camera Will Revolutionize How You Bank

It's call remote deposit capture technology: Snap a smartphone picture of a check, and deposit it electronically. And while only 3% of banking customers use it now, it could be the killer app that lures most of us into online banking.

Your 7-Step Midyear Money Checkup

With six months of earning, saving, and spending under your belt, you've got plenty of data to project how 2012 is going to play out. So let's lift the hood on your finances and give everything a good once over.

5 Signs Google Is Selling You Out

Google built its empire on innovations that served consumers well, but it's building its future on serving those consumers, and their personal data, up to advertisers.

The Super Bowl of Fakes: Big Game's a Win for Scammers

The quantity of counterfeit goods entering the U.S. is increasing, and it gets worse around an event like the Super Bowl. Federal agents recently seized more than $6 million of counterfeits and shut down more than 300 illegal websites. But consumers are at risk for more than just getting a shoddy NFL jersey.

Valentine's Scams: Don't Be a Fool for Love Online

Valentine's Day offers Internet con artists a great cover for their illegal craft: Using love as a lure, scammers sweet-talk their victims out of personal information the can use to rob you. Here's what you need to know to avoid falling for a fraud.

Tax Season Scams: How to Avoid the Fake Refund Cons

Uncle Sam isn't the only one looking to collect from taxpayers this year: A rapidly growing number of Internet scammers are also using the guise of the IRS to siphon money out of consumers' pockets, security experts say.

Financial Scams: The Latest Twists in the Art of the Con

You're not going to fall for the old Nigerian prince scam anymore -- but the fraudsters know that, and they've moved on, too. Here are some financial scams that made the rounds in 2011 -- and will likely be back in some form this year.

Phishers Are Getting Smarter, But So Are E-Cops

Traditional phishing -- where hackers attempt to acquire personal data from individuals in hopes of defrauding them -- is bad enough. But even more alarming is the rise of a new kind of attack: "spear phishing."

Scammers, Not Soldiers: Romance Cons on the Rise

Each year, a disturbing number of women fall victim to fraudsters posing as U.S. servicemen. These con artists woo them long-distance for months, then ask for cash. "A couple of years ago we were getting hundreds of calls a year about this scam," says Christopher Grey of the Army Criminal Investigation Command. "Now we get thousands."

Don't Get Conned: Free Fraud Hotline Aids, Educates

This is International Fraud Awareness Week, when various companies and nonprofit organizations work to educate people about how to avoid becoming victims of financial fraud. And we need the help: Last year, American consumers lost more than $1.7 billion to financial scams.

Spotting Financial Scammers: A Guide to Common Cons

Even as many Americans struggle to make ends meet, scammers are plotting all sorts of sneaky ways to rob them of their money -- and in millions of cases, they succeed. When it comes to these cons, the best offense is a smart defense, so here's an intro course in how to spot the latest scams.

How to Avoid Getting Skimmed By ATM Scammers

It looks like an ordinary cash machine, and you type in your PIN without a second thought. But there's a hidden device recording your ATM card's magnetic strip, and capturing your PIN. Big money is about to vanish from your bank account. Or maybe not: Here's how to prevent skimmers from getting their hands on your data.

Dead or Alive: Thousands Mistakenly Declared Deceased

Each year, some 14,000 people are wrongly declared dead by the Social Security Administration, CNNMoney reports. Data-entry errors can lead to major financial turmoil for victims of these mistakes, who they can lose their benefits and credit.

Keeping Your Credit Card Numbers Safe

With all the hackers in the headlines, you might be feeling more hesitant to offer up your credit card numbers while doing your online shopping. Virtual credit-card numbers, provided by many banks and credit-card issuers for free, can help. Here's how to use them -- and why you should still remain vigilant about checking your account if you do.

Identity Fraud More Prevalent Than You'd Imagine

At least 16% of Americans have engaged in some kind of identity fraud -- lying about their Social Security number, name or birthday -- on applications for goods and services, a new study reveals. That's 45 million people trying to game the system, and every time one succeeds, he or she may be making trouble for you.

Texting Scam Targets Jobless

A texting scam aimed at the unemployed tells them to call a telephone number for assistance with unemployment paperwork. When consumers call, they're...

Jean Chatzky: Beware, the Cost of Identity Theft Is Soaring

While the number of incidents of identity theft has dropped, the cost to get your identity back is rising. Personal Finance expert Jean Chatzky explains who is after your identity (it could be someone you know) and gives great advice on steps you must take now to protect yourself.

Identity Theft Falls 28% in 2010

Identity thieves are claiming fewer victims, but those victims are spending a lot more time and money resolving the incidents, according to a survey by research firm Javelin Strategy & Research.