Why Viacom Will Never Be Great Again

If you've been noticing a little bit less of SpongeBob on Nickelodeon, Snooki on MTV, or Stephen Colbert on Comedy Central, it's by design: Viacom is squeezing more commercials into every hour of programming. That's the bad news. The worse news is that it's not working.

What to Watch This Week: Tech Titans, Big Banks and Your Shoes

It'll be fairly quiet on the earnings front this week, but Wall Street still bears watching. Yahoo will try to cheer up investors at its annual meeting; some big banks will report; Marriott will check in; Google will add gadgets; and a major footwear company will size up its quarter.

No Video Streaming Service Will Ever Fit All

It's getting pretty crowded in the streaming space. Comcast is the latest company to throw its hat into the digital ring: It will offer existing cable subscribers access to streaming TV shows and movies through a new service called Streampix. And other streaming services, from Netflix to YouTube, are offering original content.

How the Postal Service Cuts Will Affect You

When Postal Service cuts take effect this spring, it will not only slow mail delivery, but eliminate the possibility of first-class letters being delivered in a day. Here's what you need to know about the changes, and some tips to keep you from going postal.

SpongeBob's Big Problem: An Ocean of Streaming Video

The yellow fellow who lives in a pineapple under the sea -- and all his Nickelodeon pals -- are suddenly getting kicked in the SquarePants by the on-demand video revolution. Can Viacom adjust the new order of children's entertainment before Nick's ratings sink to the ocean floor?

Take Either of 2 Tablets and Call Me Christmas Morning

At $499 and up, Apple's iPad may not fit in your holiday budget. But how about $199 or $249 for a slightly smaller, full-featured gadget? Barnes & Noble has its Nook Tablet; Amazon has the $199 Kindle Fire. Decisions, decisions ...

Why Comcast Will Never Be Great Again

It isn't easy being a cable and Internet service provider these days. Consumers are turning to cheaper options, and they're tired of paying for channels they never watch. Networks are demanding more money. Add in performance issues, it's no surprise cable companies and wireless carriers among the country's most hated companies.

Rabbit Ears Redux: Free Antenna TV Makes a Comeback

Millions of TV lovers hit by the weak economy and fat cable bills are going old-school: They're using antennas. That's right: The rabbit ears your grandmother jiggled to tune in "I Love Lucy" can still receive dozens of digital channels on HDTVs. Here's how you can rule the free airwaves.

Why Movie Watchers Are Abandoning the Multiplex

Noticed that your local movie theater is a little quieter than usual lately? Don't go thinking that moviegoers have just gotten more considerate. The reason phones aren't ringing, babies aren't wailing, and know-it-alls aren't giving away plot twists before they happen is simple: People just aren't there.

YouTube Draws Nearly 40% of Online Video Visits

YouTube has been a powerhouse in the online video arena since well before Google bought it. YouTube dominates the sector, accounting for nearly four out of 10 online video viewing sessions in the U.S. in May. What's still a question is how much the video-sharing site will add to Google profits.

Should Netflix Stream Its Video Business Into the U.K.?

Netflix is enjoying a period of rapid expansion, riding on the popularity of DVD-by-mail and online video streaming. The question for investors is: What's next? Netflix has signaled that it plans to expand abroad, and the U.K. is a likely target. But is Britain ready for Netflix?

Google Reinvents YouTube Again with Premium Channels

YouTube owner Google is giving the video site a high-class makeover, launching up to 20 premium video channels in a bid to boost revenue. But can a site people think of as the home of laughing babies and funny pets become a destination for web surfers seeking video worth paying for?

Skype's Founders May Have a Hit Music Service

Rdio was envisioned and launched by Janus Friis and Niklas Zennstrom, who have had a dry spell since starting Skype. Rdio, however, could be another smash, thanks to a confluence of trends that the duo appears to be picking up on at the right time.

Hulu Drops Price on Subscriptions After Traffic Dips

Hulu lowered the price of its newly launched Hulu Plus subscription service by $2 to $7.99 Wednesday, just days after the online streaming video service saw its rank decline on a closely watched Internet ranking service for the month of October.