housing starts

Housing Starts Fall, But Permits Rebound

Housing starts fell for a third straight month in February, but a rebound in building permits offered some hope for the housing market as it tries to emerge from a soft patch.

U.S. Housing Starts Dip But Remain at Solid Pace

U.S. homebuilders began work at a slower pace in January, though the level was still the third-highest since 2008. The pace of building was viewed as a sign of further strengthening in residential real estate.

U.S. Housing Construction Jumps to 4-Year High

U.S. builders started construction on homes in September at the fastest rate since July 2008, a further indication that the housing recovery is strengthening and could help the economy grow.

US Housing Starts Rose 2.3 Percent in August

U.S. builders started work on more homes in August, driven by the fastest pace of single-family home construction in more than two years. The increase points to steady progress in the housing recovery.

Builders Start More Single-Family Homes; Permit Requests Surge

U.S. builders started work on more single-family homes in May and requested the most permits to build homes and apartments in three and a half years. The increase suggests the housing market is slowly recovering even as other areas of the economy have weakened.

'Divorce Starts': A Leading Indicator for Home Sales?

While not everyone whose marriage ends rushes out to break ground on a new home, some real estate agents say divorcing spouses make up at least a third of their clients. With the economy impacting divorce trends and marital splits pushing spending trends, should economists be watching divorce rates when they chart the economic outlook?

Homebuilders Missing Out on the Economic Recovery

For homebuilders, it hardly feels like an economic recovery. Nearly two years after the recession ended, the pace of construction is less than half the level considered healthy. That weakness is weighing on the economy: Though new homes represent a small portion of overall sales, they have an outsized effect on jobs.