honeywell

30 Top Companies Spent More on Lobbying than Taxes

Thirty large American corporations -- all of them profitable -- spent more money on lobbying than they paid in federal taxes from 2008 to 2010, according to a report from the nonpartisan reform group Public Campaign.

CEOs 'Encouraged' by Business Talks with Obama

The CEOs of 18 big companies, including Google, Boeing and General Electric, met with President Barack Obama to discuss the U.S. economy and the country's international competitiveness Wednesday.

Four Stocks to Buy After CEOs Meet With Obama

The CEOs of 20 companies are visiting the White House Wednesday, and those executives will try to get something in return for the political cover they're giving President Obama. That could mean higher earnings for their shareholders down the road -- so which ones should you have in your 2011 portfolio?

Will a New SEC Rule Bring Democracy to the Boardroom?

How much power should shareholders have when it comes to running a company? Usually, the answer is 'very little'. But a new rule change by the SEC may change that, allowing the people who actually own a company more input into how it is run.

Putting Energy-Hog Buildings on a Strict Diet

Cutting energy use inside buildings -- both commercial and residential -- has become a hot market for a growing number of technology companies, from giants such as General Electric and Intel to Silicon Valley startups. And the federal government is an eager booster.

Honeywell Reports 2Q Earnings of 60 Cents Per Share

Honeywell (HON) reported earnings of 60 cents per diluted share, unchanged from the second quarter of 2009. Sales rose 8% to $8.2 billion, driven by strong gains in transportation systems and specialty materials. Earnings excluding non-cash pension expenses were up 24% to 78 cents a share, the company said in a statement.

Corporate Pollution: The Top 10 Environmental Payouts

The $20 billion fund BP has agreed to for paying Gulf oil spill claims easily vaults it to the top of the list. Among other members of this shameful pantheon are Exxon, Union Carbide and Pacific Gas and Electric. A closer look at this group reveals that in most cases, the companies managed to reduce -- or even erase -- settlements through years of legal stalling.