great recession

Has the Gold Rush Come to An End?

Gold, often touted as the most trustworthy of investments, has looked wild over the past month, plunging $200 in April. Where is it headed next?

U.S. Stocks Keep Rising as S&P 500 Nears Record High

Encouraging news from the job market pushed the stock market up early Thursday, putting the Standard & Poor's 500 index near its all-time high. The S&P 500 rose seven points to 1,561 -- just four points away from the high it hit in October 2007 -- before retreating marginally after 10 a.m.

In Silicon Valley, the 'Recovery' Has Left Many in the Dust

The Silicon Valley is adding jobs faster than it has in more than a decade. Stocks and fortunes are soaring. But bleaker records are also being set: Food stamp participation just hit a 10-year high and homelessness rose 20 percent in two years. Simply put, while the ultra-rich are getting even richer, record numbers of Silicon Valley residents are slipping into poverty.

Why Smart Investors Should Support Immigration Reform

For the first time in a generation, there seems to be political will on both sides of the aisle to pass new immigration legislation. It's an issue generally framed as a political or cultural one, but it has profound consequences for investors, businesses and the whole U.S. economy.

Why It's Really Time to Break Up the Too Big to Fail Banks

When the financial crisis hit, Washington chose to rescue America's biggest banks, lest their failure crush the economy. Now, "too big to fail" has morphed into "too big to jail," and letting them remain that way isn't good for the economy -- or the banking industry.

10 Mistakes That Turn Investors Into Their Own Worst Enemies

The hardest part of investing can sometimes be getting out of your own way. Too often, we let emotions guide our investing strategies, with disastrous results. A new study reveals the most common mistakes: We've summed up the popular pitfalls so you can avoid them.

Did You Miss Out On Your Share of $200 Billion?

You'll never have the chance to lose $200 billion, but the odds are good that, over the past several years, you lost your personal share of $200 billion in potential investment gains. But here's the good part: The kinds of mistakes that cost us that cash are entirely avoidable. Here's how.

Fiscal Cliff Averted: And Here Are the Next 6 Crises to Worry About

The fiscal cliff has been averted -- at least for now. But if we've managed to dodge one devastating, intentionally-created crisis, there are plenty more massive problems on deck. Here's a list of the next six ways Washington could mess things up for tens of millions of Americans.

Fiscal Cliff Averted: 6 Things You Can Stop Worrying About

After months of lead-up, America finally went over the fiscal cliff -- for about 34 hours, before a bipartisan compromise was reached. So, with an eye toward the bright side, here's are six things that you no longer need to worry about now that the fiscal cliff has been averted.

The 6 Biggest Busted Bets of 2012

As pundits and politicians rush to sew the year up into a neat little bundle, we decided to look at 2012 from a slightly different angle. Here is our list of the year's worst bets -- six developments that seemed like sure things in January, but were bust by December.

The 9 Most Important Financial Stories of 2012

Sometimes the most important news stories get overshadowed by short-term crises and teakettle tempests. With that in mind, we at DailyFinance decided to take a look back at the nine stories of 2012 that are likely to have the biggest impact on your wallet in the year ahead.

Home Prices Rise in October by 6.3%, the Most in 6 Years

U.S. home prices rose 6.3 percent in October compared with a year ago, the largest yearly gain since July 2006. The jump adds to signs of a comeback in the housing market. But month-over-month, prices fell 0.2 percent in October from September, reflecting the end of the summer home-buying season.

Happy Fifth Anniversary, Great Recession!

According to the National Bureau of Economic Records, December 2007 is the when the Great Recession began. Five years later, the economy still hasn't recovered. DailyFinance takes a look back.

The End of Men? More Like Tough Times For Everyone

The recession hit men hardest, and women are doing better in the recovery, too. But the popular idea that the era of the female-dominated economy is at hand is distracting us from a deeply disturbing trend: Women's apparent gains are camouflaging a massive decline for workers of both genders.

Goodbye, Payroll Tax Holiday; Hello, Tax Hike for the 47%

Even if you're part of the 47% who don't pay federal income taxes, you probably do pay payroll taxes. A few years ago, President Obama and his allies in Congress cut you a break to ease the pain of the recession: a 2 percentage point payroll tax holiday. Well, the holiday is over.

Credit Card Horror Tales: 5 Ways Bad Plastic Kills Your Finances

The credit card market remains plagued by cards built to kill your savings, despite the consumer-friendly reforms of the CARD Act and record-low interest rates for most loans. Here are the five most common ways the worst credit cards prey on unsuspecting consumers.

Are You Better Off Than You Were Four Years Ago?

It's the question every incumbent up for reelection has had to answer since challenger Ronald Reagan first posed it to President Jimmy Carter in 1980. But in this 2012 campaign, the answer is not so simple, for all the rhetoric on both sides.

The 5 Richest and 5 Poorest States in America

Median household income in the United States declined for the second straight year in 2011, the Census Bureau reports -- falling more than 8% below its 2007 pre-recession peak. But some states are faring far better than the average -- and, of course, some are faring far worse.