fiscal stimulus

Obama Assails GOP Over Economic Policies

Laying out details for his new economic stimulus program Wednesday, President Barack Obama regained his political swagger and ramped up his criticism of Republican leaders for failing to provide substantive policies that can help the nation's economic recovery regain momentum.

Could Congress Eliminate the Federal Budget Deficit?

The annual U.S. budget deficit is well over a trillion dollars, and in the long term, that's unsustainable. But a closer look at the sources of most of that gap shows that balancing the budget wouldn't be nearly as hard as it might at first appear.

Construction Sector Woes Worse Than Expected in July

The U.S. construction industry went from bad to worse in July, and then retroactively worse still. The Commerce Department announced Wednesday that spending in the sector fell a worse-than-expected 1% in July, and revised June's estimate downward from a 0.1% increase to an 0.8% decline.

Economists: Boost Growth Now, Fix Deficit Later

The National Association for Business Economics released its semiannual Economic Policy Survey Sunday, and nearly 60% of respondents said they support the Fed's monetary policies. But only 39% feel the administration's fiscal stance is appropriate, and 75% oppose another stimulus package.

Risky Business: No Easy Policy Options Left for the Fed

As he addresses the nation%u2019s weak economy, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke doesn%u2019t just face the traditional risks of rising inflation or an economic stall, but a polarized, caustic political climate that will make creative solutions even harder to propose, let alone implement.

Mixed News on Construction Spending

Boosted by the government's fiscal stimulus, construction spending unexpectedly rose 0.1% in June, the Commerce Department said. However, June's mild good news was offset by a large, downward revision to a 1% spending decline from a previously-announced 0.2% decline for May.

More Stimulus Needed: Gift Cards for All?

A year ago, MarketWatch economist Irwin Kellner proposed an unconventional idea to jump-start the U.S. economy, and it was scoffed at and largely ignored by Washington and Wall Street. Too bad, because if it was used, perhaps the U.S. unemployment rate would be half what it is today.